jeunesse

 

  • ‘Civil society needs a compelling counter-narrative’

    Ahead of the publication of the 2018 State of Civil Society Report on the theme of ‘Reimagining Democracy’, we are interviewing civil society activists and leaders about their work to promote democratic practices and principles, the challenges they encounter and the victories they score in doing so. CIVICUS speaks to Lynnette Micheni from PAWA254, an organisation that fosters social accountability and active citizenship among young people, mainly through arts and media.

    1.Your organisation, PAWA254, defines itself as a movement of young, socially conscious artists and activists. How do you connect art and activism in your work?

    We use art, pop culture and media as an empowerment tool. We believe in artistic expression as a means for social change and the deepening of democracy, and we harness it to advocate for the rights and responsibilities of Kenyans, and against social and political vices, including corruption and abuse of power. As a result of our work, we have seen ‘artivists’ multiply, and a movement of active, freethinking youth emerge in our country.

    We work with a variety of arts and media, including photography, film, spoken word, poetry graffiti, cartoons, blogging and writivism, which has opened such great spaces for accountability in Kenya.

    Our programs are two pronged: some focus on the economic development of emerging creatives and activists and others on social accountability, all the while leveraging the arts, pop culture and media.

    The former entails developing the capacity of emerging artists and facilitating the integration of artistic expression for livelihoods development through the provision of a state-of-the-art co- working space consisting of creative suites, professional equipment, skills transfer and networking opportunities. PAWA convenes key annual events such as the PAWA Festival, an annual street festival that showcases East Africa’s visual and performing arts and disseminates the Kenya Photography Awards.

    Our social accountability programs entail using art and pop culture as a form of civic engagement through dance, poetry, graffiti, theatre, music, film and photography to spark civic participation by focusing attention on emerging social concerns in the country and to prompt action in the process. Key current interventions include Off-The-Record, a weekly space where participants can express their thoughts on issues affecting society strictly off the record, with no fear of censorship or repercussions; #JengaHustle, an initiative aimed at advancing policies regarding employment and decent jobs for youth; #EmergingVoices, an intergenerational leadership development project aimed at empowering emerging social justice organisers and #ARealManIs, a transformative masculinity project aimed at leveraging media in mobilising young men’s fight against gender-based violence.

    2. Does artivism, and activism in general, face any challenges in Kenya?

    Indeed. Civil society is currently fighting a battle for its legitimacy, and it’s not winning. From every podium, including national television, the government is pushing a narrative discrediting civil society. Last year, two prominent human rights civil society organisations (CSOs) were shut down over their alleged non-compliance with regulations, including tax and employment laws, and for operating without a licence. There have been attempts to de-register other organisations as well.

    The prevailing narrative is that activists and CSOs are donor-funded disrupters. The idea is also being disseminated that people do it for the money. If you mobilise, you are asked: ‘how much have you been paid?’ – like there is no other driver than money. Ideas or visions of change don’t count. They will say that critical civil society activists and organisations are ‘Soros people’ - implying they are being funded by the Open Society Foundations and are therefore puppets of foreign interests. It is very difficult to counter this narrative when it is constantly being propagated on national television.

    It is also a challenge that there is a growing apathy amongst young people who are very well aware of their constitutional rights, resulting in an overreliance on individual activists.

    3. What is being done in response to this?

    What needs to be done is put together and disseminate a compelling counter-narrative. We know this is difficult because the problem has deep roots. So, the first thing we need to do is understand why it is so easy for governments to target civil society, in Kenya and elsewhere.

    We first heard about ‘fake news’ a couple of years ago, and it was all happening far away, in the USA. But the trend has progressed very fast, and in the context of presidential elections last year we suffered an epidemic of fake news. It was all over social media, which is a major source of information for Kenyan citizens, and it distorted the political conversation, and maybe the outcomes of the elections as well. Young people, the group that most uses social media, were particularly misled by fake news stories aimed at stirring conflict and dividing civil society.

    The abundance of fake news can be very disconcerting for young people that have little experience with interpreting data and are ill-equipped to tell the difference between legitimate and fake information. How do you sustain online movements while avoiding the infiltration of narratives based on fake news? How do you manage to bring online movements offline and keep them going in a context in which the political discussion is distorted to such extent?

    Young people are also particularly vulnerable to empty electoral promises of jobs and other benefits. Lots of promises are made at election times but no policies are ever enacted to fulfil them afterward. And people keep believing every time. The problem is that we have a whole generation of people who form their opinions based on headlines, and also build their activism on the basis of headlines – and under the headlines, there is usually no real content.

    The government is aware that evidence-based activism is lacking, and they do have smart and better prepared people, so they sometimes invite civil society to the table and pair them with a government technician, even on live television. Civil society activists are not always in a position to prepare adequately to respond. So it is difficult to connect and sustain civil society struggles, and instead it is so easy for the government to co-opt civil society actors.

    This is why we work to empower people, and young people in particular, to seek facts, to interpret them and understand their implications, to make decisions based on them, and to use them to monitor the government, hold it accountable and ensure it responds to citizens’ needs. We believe that arts, pop culture and media remain a viable tool to engage with the youth and are keen to continue investing in them.

    Civic space in Kenya is rated as ‘obstructed’ by theCIVICUS Monitor.

    Get in touch with PAWA254 through itswebsite orFacebook page, or follow@Pawa254 and@LynnetteMicheni on Twitter.

     

  • ÉTATS-UNIS : « L'élection de 2020 est un mandat politique et moral contre le fascisme »

    CIVICUS discute de la suppression d’électeurs et de ses implications pour la démocratie aux États-Unis avec Yael Bromberg, conseillère principale dans le domaine du droit de vote à la Fondation Andrew Goodman, une organisation qui travaille pour rendre la voix des jeunes - l'un des groupes d'électeurs les plus sous-représentés aux États-Unis – une force puissante pour la démocratie. La Fondation a été créée en 1966 pour perpétuer l'esprit et la mission d'Andy Goodman, qui en 1964 a rejoint Freedom Summer, un projet pour inscrire au vote les Afro-américains afin de démanteler la ségrégation et l'oppression, et a été assassiné par le Ku Klux Klan lors de son premier jour au Mississippi. La Fondation soutient le développement du leadership des jeunes, l'accessibilité au vote et des initiatives de justice sociale dans près d'une centaine d'établissements d'enseignement supérieur à travers le pays.

    Yael Bromberg

    Pour un observateur extérieur, il est déroutant qu'un pays qui se présente comme le paradigme de la démocratie érige des barrières qui limitent le droit de vote de millions de ses citoyens. Pouvez-vous nous parler un peu plus sur le phénomène de suppression des électeurs aux États-Unis ?

    Il est vrai que les États-Unis se sont présentés comme un modèle de démocratie. En tant que citoyenne immigrée naturalisée dont les grands-parents ont survécu à l'Holocauste et aux goulags soviétiques, j'apprécie le caractère unique de certaines des libertés dont bénéficie ce pays. Par exemple, alors même que notre système judiciaire est actuellement gravement menacé par la politisation et la polarisation des juges, il a généralement résisté au type de corruption enraciné dans d'autres pays. Bien que notre système juridique soit sous tension et qu'il existe certaines pratiques bien ancrées, telles que l'impunité policière extrême, qui doivent être corrigées, notre système législatif peut, s'il le souhaite, combler les lacunes du système judiciaire. Même si l'injection de grosses sommes d'argent, y compris de l'argent provenant de sources obscures, a étouffé notre politique, les plus sérieux défenseurs de la démocratie, qui ont résisté à bien pire, nous apprennent que la démocratie est un chemin long et persistant plus qu'une destination. Certes, dans ce pays, nous avons des problèmes systémiques qui nécessitent une réforme profonde, et les vies de personnes en chair et en os sont sous péril à cause des dysfonctionnements de la tyrannie d'une minorité. Mais nous avons aussi les principes fondateurs des Etats-Unis - la liberté et l'égalité - et la capacité d’atteindre notre idéal.

    A l’époque fondatrice de cette nation, seuls les hommes blancs qui possédaient des biens avaient le droit de vote. Grâce au processus de ratification constitutionnelle, l'esclavage a été aboli et le droit de vote a été accordé aux hommes libres. Des lois injustes ont persisté, tels que les tests d'alphabétisation et les taxes électorales, utilisés pour empêcher les minorités raciales de voter. Cela a été combiné avec d'autres lois de l'ère Jim Crow qui offraient des raisons arbitraires pour emprisonner les esclaves libérés et les forcer à retourner dans les camps de travail, les privant du droit de vote une fois libres. La résistance populaire s'est accrue au fur et à mesure que la violence physique et politique du système de ségrégation devenait apparente dans les années 1960, entraînant des lois plus fortes et de nouveaux amendements constitutionnels.

    Aujourd'hui, la suppression d’électeurs équivaut à la situation du renard gardant le poulailler. Ceux qui ont le privilège de définir les lois déterminent l’inclusion des uns et l’exclusion des autres. Par exemple, des lois strictes d'identification des électeurs qui vont au-delà de l'exigence d'une preuve d'identité standard se sont répandues partout dans le pays après l'élection d'Obama à la présidence. L'Alabama a établi des règles strictes d'identification des électeurs et a par la suite fermé les bureaux de délivrance des permis de conduire, où de telles identifications pouvaient être obtenues, dans les grandes zones rurales de l'état où réside la population noire. Les politiciens dessinent les limites de leurs districts pour assurer l'avenir de leur propre parti et leurs opportunités personnelles futures d’accès au poste. Il n'y a pas de bureaux de vote sur les campus universitaires, où les jeunes sont concentrés. Même pendant une pandémie mondiale, voter par correspondance n'est toujours pas un droit universel. Alors qu'un état, le New Jersey, établit au moins dix bureaux de vote par ville pour recueillir les bulletins de vote envoyés par la poste, un autre, le Texas, a fait recours aux tribunaux afin d’en limiter la quantité à un par comté, et a obtenu gain de cause. Ainsi, lorsque ces lois sont portées devant les tribunaux, ceux-ci ne se prononcent pas toujours en faveur des électeurs, ce qui est d’autant plus grave.

    La saison électorale de 2020 a été particulièrement surprenante. La magistrature fédérale semble obsédée par l'idée que les modifications de dernière minute des règles électorales conduisent à la suppression des électeurs, et ce même lorsqu'il s'agit de lois qui élargissent l'accès au vote. Cela défie la logique. Si une loi y limite l'accès, c'est compréhensible. Mais si une loi élargit simplement l'accès, le préjudice porté aux électeurs est difficilement identifiable.

    La question qui découle naturellement de notre paradigme est la suivante : si l'Amérique est vraiment un exemple de démocratie, alors pourquoi avons-nous peur d'embrasser les trois premiers mots de notre Constitution : « Nous, le peuple » ?

    Considérez-vous que la suppression des électeurs constitue une problématique cruciale dans le contexte des élections présidentielles de 2020 ?

    Absolument. L'élection présidentielle de 2020 engendre au moins cinq conclusions importantes : 1) Les gouvernements étatiques peuvent facilement élargir l'accès aux urnes en toute sécurité, notamment en prolongeant les périodes de vote anticipé et les possibilités de voter par correspondance; 2) Les électeurs de tous les partis profitent de ces mécanismes et en bénéficient, comme en témoigne le taux de participation électorale de cette année; 3) L'expansion et la modernisation électorales ne conduisent pas à la fraude électorale; 4) Cette année, les électeurs ont été motivés à voter malgré les obstacles discriminatoires et arbitraires qui se dressaient sur leur chemin; 5) Le mythe de la fraude électorale, plus que la preuve réelle et systémique de fraude, est apparu comme une menace importante à la fois pour protéger l'accès aux urnes et pour maintenir la confiance du public dans notre système électoral.

    En 2013, la Cour Suprême a supprimé une disposition clé de la loi de 1965 sur les droits de vote. Ce garde-fou exigeait que les états présentant une trajectoire historique de suppression des électeurs obtiennent une approbation avant de modifier leurs lois électorales. Une fois la sauvegarde supprimée, les portes vers la suppression d’électeurs se sont ouvertes. Le nombre de bureaux de vote a été réduit : 1 700 bureaux de vote ont été fermés entre 2012 et 2018, dont 1 100 entre les élections de mi-mandat de 2014 et 2018. Des lois strictes d'identification des électeurs ont été adoptées, ce qui rend difficile l'accès au vote pour les pauvres, les personnes de couleur et les jeunes. D'autres mesures, telles que la purge des listes électorales des états et la re-délimitation des circonscriptions électorales, ont encore dilué le pouvoir du vote. Il est important de garder à l'esprit que tout cela se fait au détriment des contribuables, qui paient la facture d'un système judiciaire engorgé par des dossiers accumulés et des frais de justice du parti au pouvoir ; et aux dépens des électeurs, qui sont contraints d'accepter les résultats d'un système électoral truqué, bien que dans le futur une législation qui supprime les électeurs puisse être abrogée.

    Le chant mensonger de la fraude électorale a provoqué une régression des droits dans tous les domaines. Il n'y a aucune raison pour que, en particulier en pleine pandémie, l'accès au vote par correspondance ne soit pas universel. Cependant, huit états n'autorisaient que les électeurs de plus d'un certain âge à voter par correspondance, mais pas les plus jeunes. La pandémie ne discrimine pas et notre système électoral ne devrait pas le faire non plus. De même, le service postal des États-Unis s'est soudainement politisé car il devenait de plus en plus évident que les gens voteraient par la poste en nombre sans précédent. Les discussions sur sa privatisation ont repris et des ordres de démantèlement de machines coûteuses de tri du courrier ont été donnés ayant pour seul objectif de supprimer des votes. Après l'élection, la campagne électorale de Trump a beaucoup nuit dans sa tentative de délégitimer les résultats, malgré le fait qu'aucune preuve de fraude électorale n'ait été trouvée dans les plus de 50 poursuites qui ont contesté le résultat des élections. Or il a rendu un mauvais service au pays, car il a convaincu une proportion substantielle de la base de l'un des grands partis politiques de remettre en question le résultat d'une élection que l'Agence pour les Infrastructures et la Cybersécurité avait déclarée « la plus sûre dans l’histoire des États-Unis ».

    Pendant que tout cela se déroulait, la pandémie a également entraîné une extension de l'accès dans des domaines essentiels. Même certains états dirigés par les républicains ont mené l'élargissement de la période de vote anticipé et l'accès aux systèmes de vote par correspondance. Nous devons saisir cela comme une opportunité d'apprentissage pour conduire une modernisation électorale sensée, de sorte qu'il ne s'agisse pas d'un événement ponctuel associé à la pandémie. Le COVID-19 a normalisé la modernisation électorale, qui est passée d'une question marginale du progressisme à une question inscrite à l'ordre du jour partagé, accroissant le domaine d’action et le pouvoir des électeurs de tous les horizons politiques. De plus, si les poursuites sans fin et sans fondement intentées par la campagne de Trump peuvent imprégner un certain segment des électeurs, on se demande si elles finiront par convaincre le pouvoir judiciaire qu'il n'y a pas de fraude électorale généralisée. Ceci est important car de nouvelles lois étatiques de suppression des électeurs seront sans doute introduites à la suite de ces élections, comme après l'élection d'Obama en 2008, et celles-ci seront certainement contestées devant les tribunaux. Peut-être que cette fois-ci le pouvoir judiciaire répondra différemment à ces défis, à la lumière de l'examen du processus électoral de 2020.

    Aussi persistants que soient les efforts de suppression des électeurs, la réponse lors de ce cycle a été de submerger le système dans l’accroissement de participation électorale. Comme prévu, la participation électorale a atteint des niveaux sans précédent. Les premières estimations indiquent que la participation des jeunes à ce cycle était encore plus élevée qu'en 1971, quand l'âge de voter a été abaissée à 18 ans et que l'inscription des électeurs potentiels a été soudainement élargie. Nous ne pouvons tout simplement pas nous permettre le niveau d’apathie électorale que nous avons connu dans le passé. En 2016, il y a eu des victoires de marge très faibles dans trois états clés : le Michigan, de 0,2%, la Pennsylvanie, de 0,7% et le Wisconsin, de 0,8%. La suppression d’électeurs peut très certainement faire la différence dans les affrontements avec des marges aussi étroites. Cependant, il ne faut pas oublier le pouvoir de vote : environ 43% des personnes habiles à voter n'ont pas voté en 2016. Les estimations les plus récentes indiquent qu'environ 34% des personnes qui peuvent voter, soit environ un sur trois, n'ont pas voté en 2020. Comment maintenir ce nouveau taux de participation record, voire l'améliorer, alors que l'option du fascisme n'est plus en jeu dans les urnes ?

    Pouvez-vous nous parler du travail de la Fondation Andrew Goodman dans l'intersection entre deux grands enjeux : le droit de vote et le racisme systémique ?

    La mission de la Fondation Andrew Goodman est de transformer les voix et les votes des jeunes en une force puissante pour la démocratie. Notre programme Vote Everywhere est un mouvement national non partisan dirigé par des jeunes pour l'engagement civique et la justice sociale, présent sur des campus partout dans le pays. Le programme offre une formation, des ressources et un accès à un réseau de pairs. Nos ambassadeurs Andrew Goodman enregistrent les jeunes électeurs, éliminent les obstacles au vote et abordent d'importantes questions de justice sociale. Nous sommes présents dans près de 100 campus à travers le pays et avons une présence sur un large éventail de campus, y compris des institutions visant principalement des personnes noires, comme les collèges et universités historiquement afro-américains.

    Ce qui est puissant dans l'organisation et le vote des jeunes, c'est que cela transcende tous les clivages : sexe, race, origine nationale et même appartenance à un parti. Cette situation est née dans l'histoire de l'expansion du vote des jeunes en 1971, lorsque le 26e amendement à la Constitution a été ratifié, abaissant l'âge de vote à 18 ans et interdisant la discrimination fondée sur l'âge dans l'accès au droit de vote. Il s'agit de l'amendement le plus rapidement ratifié de l'histoire américaine, en grande partie parce qu'il a reçu un soutien quasi unanime à travers les divisions partisanes. Il a été reconnu que les jeunes électeurs aident à maintenir la boussole morale du pays, comme l'a déclaré le président de l'époque, Richard Nixon, lors de la cérémonie de signature de l'amendement.

    L'héritage d'Andrew Goodman est directement lié aux luttes de solidarité entre les communautés pour le bien de l'ensemble. Tout au long des années 1960, des étudiants noirs du sud se sont courageusement assis face aux comptoirs de salles appartenant aux Blancs lors d'un acte politique de désobéissance dans le but de protester pour atteindre l'intégration et l'égalité. En mai 1964, de jeunes Américains de tout le pays se sont rendus dans le sud à l’occasion du Freedom Summer pour inscrire des électeurs noirs et abolir le système de ségrégation de Jim Crow. Trois jeunes activistes des droits civiques ont été tués par le Ku Klux Klan avec le soutien du bureau du shérif du comté : Andy Goodman et Mickey Schwerner, deux hommes juifs de New York, ayant tout juste 20 et 24 ans, et James Chaney, un homme noir du Mississippi, de seulement 21 ans. Leurs histoires ont touché une corde sensible qui a contribué à galvaniser le soutien à l'adoption de la loi sur les droits civils de 1964 et de la loi sur les droits de vote de 1965. C'est une histoire sur le pouvoir de jeunes visionnaires qui luttent pour leur avenir, sur la solidarité et le pouvoir qui peuvent être construits à partir de la confluence et du travail conjoint d'Américains d'origines différentes.

    Les jeunes activistes ont dirigé divers mouvements de justice sociale des années 60, tout comme ils le font encore aujourd'hui. Lorsque ce pays a répondu en adoptant des réformes critiques, les jeunes ont utilisé leur propre droit de vote lorsqu'ils ont été envoyés à la mort au début de la guerre interminable du Vietnam. Aujourd'hui, les jeunes mènent l'appel pour la justice climatique, le contrôle des armes à feu, la dignité humaine pour nos communautés noires et immigrées et l'accès à l'enseignement supérieur. Ce sont eux qui ont le plus à gagner ou à perdre aux élections, car ce sont eux qui hériteront l’avenir. Ils reconnaissent, en particulier à la lumière des changements démographiques que le pays a connus, que la question du droit de vote des jeunes est une question de justice raciale. Dans la mesure où nous pouvons voir le vote des jeunes comme un facteur unificateur, puisque tous les électeurs ont autrefois été jeunes, nous espérons insuffler un peu de bon sens dans un système controversé et polarisé.

    L'espace civique aux États-Unis est classé « obstrué » par leCIVICUS Monitor.
    Entrez en contact avec la Fondation Andrew Goodman via sonsite Web ou sa pageFacebook, et suivez@AndrewGoodmanF et@YaelBromberg sur Twitter.

     

  • OUGANDA : « Personne ne peut gagner les élections sans le vote des jeunes »

    CIVICUS s'entretient avec Mohammed Ndifuna, directeur exécutif de Justice Access Point-Uganda (JAP). Établi en 2018, le JAP cherche à faire avancer, encourager et renforcer la lutte pour la justice dans le contexte du processus de justice transitionnelle bloqué en Ouganda, des difficultés du pays à mettre en œuvre les recommandations de ses premier et deuxième examens périodiques universels au Conseil des droits de l’Homme des Nations Unies, et face à la réaction de certains États africains contre la Cour pénale internationale.

    Mohammed est un défenseur des droits humains et un travailleur de la paix expérimenté et passionné, avec plus de 15 ans d'activisme des droits humains et de prévention des atrocités aux niveaux local, national et international. En 2014, il a reçu le Prix des droits de l’Homme de l'Union européenne pour l'Ouganda ; Il a siégé au comité directeur de la Coalition for the Criminal Court (2007-2018) et au conseil consultatif du Human Rights House Network à Oslo (2007-2012). Il siège actuellement au comité de gestion du Comité national ougandais pour la prévention du génocide et des atrocités de masse.

    Mohammed Ndifuna

    Quel est l'état de l'espace civique en Ouganda à l'approche des élections tant attendues en 2021 ?

    L'espace civique en Ouganda peut être caractérisé comme un espace harcelé, étouffé et pillé. La société civile semble être sur une sorte de pente glissante alors que les choses tournent de mal en pis. Par exemple, les organisations de la société civile (OSC) ont subi une vague d'attaques effrontées contre leur espace physique qui ont pris la forme d'effractions dans leurs bureaux en plein jour. Pendant ce temps, les attaques contre les OSC en général, et en particulier celles qui défendent les droits humains et encouragent la responsabilité, se sont poursuivies. Ces dernières années, un certain nombre de mesures législatives et administratives ont été adoptées à l'encontre des OSC et d'autres secteurs, comme la loi sur la gestion de l'ordre public (2012) et la loi sur les ONG (2016).

    Face aux élections générales et présidentielles, qui se tiendront le 14 janvier 2021, le ministre de l'Intérieur a établi que toutes les OSC doivent passer par un processus obligatoire de validation et de vérification pour pouvoir fonctionner. De nombreuses OSC n'ont pas été en mesure d'achever le processus. De ce fait, au 19 octobre 2020, seulement 2 257 OSC avaient terminé avec succès le processus de vérification et de validation, et celles-ci ne comprenaient que quelques OSC qui plaident en faveur des questions de gouvernance.

    Les OSC ougandaises sont fortement dépendantes des donateurs et étaient déjà aux prises avec des ressources financières réduites, ce qui a fortement affecté la portée de leur travail. Cette situation a été exacerbée par l'épidémie de COVID-19 et les mesures de verrouillage prises en réponse, qui ont sapé les efforts de mobilisation des ressources des OSC. Ainsi, la combinaison de ces trois forces - harcèlement, restrictions et accès limité au financement - a affaibli les OSC, obligeant la plupart à concentrer leurs efforts sur leur propre survie.

    Il semblerait que les enjeux des élections de 2021 soient bien plus importants que les années précédentes. Qu'est ce qui a changé ?

    La situation a commencé à changer en juillet 2019, lorsque Robert Kyagulanyi, mieux connu sous son nom de scène, Bobi Wine, a annoncé qu'il se présenterait à la présidence en tant que candidat à la plate-forme de l'opposition nationale pour l'unité. Bobi Wine est un chanteur, acteur, activiste et politicien. En tant que leader du mouvement du Pouvoir Populaire, Notre Pouvoir, il a été élu législateur en 2017.

    L'attention que Bobi reçoit des jeunes est énorme et il faut tenir compte du fait que plus de 75% de la population ougandaise a moins de 30 ans. Cela fait des jeunes un groupe qu'il est essentiel d'attirer. Aucun candidat ne peut remporter les élections ougandaises s'il ne recueille pas la majorité des voix des jeunes. Lors de la prochaine course présidentielle, Bobi Wine semble être le candidat le plus capable d'attirer ces votes. Bien qu'il n'ait pas beaucoup d'expérience en tant que politicien, Bobi est une personnalité très charismatique et a réussi à attirer non seulement des jeunes mais aussi de nombreux politiciens des partis traditionnels dans son mouvement de masse.

    Longtemps connu comme le « président du ghetto », Bobi Wine a utilisé son appel en tant que star de la musique populaire pour produire des chansons politiques et mobiliser les gens. Ses racines dans le ghetto l'ont également rendu plus attractif dans les zones urbaines. On pense que cela a motivé de nombreux jeunes à s'inscrire pour voter, il est donc possible que l'apathie des jeunes électeurs diminue par rapport aux élections précédentes.

    Face à la lutte acharnée actuelle pour les votes des jeunes, il n'est pas étonnant que l'appareil de sécurité se soit violemment attaqué aux jeunes, dans une tentative évidente de contenir la pression qu'ils exercent. De nombreux activistes politiques liés au Pouvoir Populaire ont été harcelés et, dans certains cas, tués. Plusieurs dirigeants politiques du Pouvoir Populaire ont été détenus intermittemment et poursuivis devant les tribunaux, ou auraient été enlevés et torturés dans des lieux clandestins. Dans une tentative évidente d'attirer les jeunes du ghetto, le président Yoweri Museveni a nommé trois personnes du ghetto comme conseillers présidentiels. Cela ouvre la possibilité que les gangs du ghetto et la violence jouent un rôle dans les prochaines élections présidentielles. 

     

    Lors des élections précédentes, la liberté d'expression et l'utilisation d'Internet ont été restreintes. Peut-on s’attendre à voir des tendances similaires cette fois ?

    Nous les voyons déjà. La préoccupation concernant la restriction de la liberté d'expression et d'information est valable non seulement rétrospectivement, mais aussi en raison de plusieurs événements récents. Par exemple, le 7 septembre 2020, la Commission ougandaise des communications (CCU) a publié un avis public indiquant que toute personne souhaitant publier des informations sur Internet doit demander et obtenir une licence de la CCU avant le 5 octobre 2020. Cela affectera principalement les internautes, tels que les blogueurs, qui sont payés pour le contenu qu'ils publient. De toute évidence, cela tente de supprimer les activités politiques des jeunes sur Internet. Et c'est aussi particulièrement inquiétant car, étant donné que les réunions et assemblées publiques sont limitées en raison des mesures de prévention de la COVID-19, les médias numériques seront la seule méthode autorisée de campagne pour les élections de 2021.

    La surveillance électronique a également augmenté, et la possibilité d'un arrêt des plateformes de médias sociaux à la veille des élections n'est pas écartée.

    Comment la pandémie de COVID-19 a-t-elle affecté la société civile et sa capacité à répondre aux restrictions d'espace civique ?

    La pandémie de COVID-19 et les mesures prises en réponse ont exacerbé l'état déjà précaire des OSC. Par exemple, la capacité de la société civile d'organiser des rassemblements publics et des manifestations pacifiques en faveur des droits et libertés fondamentaux, ou de protester contre leur violation, a été limitée par la manière dont les procédures opérationnelles standard (POS) ont été appliquées pour faire face à la COVID-19. Cela a entraîné des violations et des attaques contre l'espace civique. Par exemple, le 17 octobre 2020, les forces de police ougandaises et les unités de défense locales ont effectué une effraction conjointe lors d'une réunion de prière de Thanksgiving qui se tenait dans le district de Mityana et ont gazé gratuitement la congrégation, qui comprenait des enfants, des femmes, des hommes, des personnes âgées et des chefs religieux ; la raison alléguée était que les personnes rassemblées avaient désobéi aux POS pour la COVID-19.

    Dès que la mise en œuvre des POS pour la COVID-19 entre en contact avec la pression électorale, il est possible que la répression des libertés de réunion pacifique et d'association s'aggrave. Malheureusement, les OSC sont déjà fortement restreintes.

    Comment la société civile internationale peut-elle aider la société civile ougandaise ?

    La situation de la société civile ougandaise est telle qu’elle nécessite l’appui et la réponse urgents de la communauté internationale. Vous devez prêter attention à ce qui se passe en Ouganda et vous exprimer d'une manière qui amplifie les voix d'une société civile locale de plus en plus étouffée. Plus spécifiquement, les OSC ougandaises devraient être soutenues afin qu'elles puissent mieux répondre aux violations flagrantes des libertés, atténuer les risques impliqués dans leur travail et améliorer leur résilience dans le contexte actuel.

    L'espace civique en Ouganda est classé comme « répressif » par leCIVICUS Monitor.
    Contactez Justice Access Point via leursite Web ou leur pageFacebook, et suivez@JusticessP sur Twitter.