COP26

 

  • COP26: ‘My hope lies in the people coming together to demand justice’

    Mitzi Jonelle TanIn the run-up to the 26th United Nations Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26), which will take place in Glasgow, UK between 31 October and 12 November 2021, CIVICUS is interviewing civil society activists, leaders and experts about the environmental challenges they face in their contexts, the actions they are undertaking to tackle them and their expectations for the upcoming summit.

    CIVICUS speaks with Mitzi Jonelle Tan, a young climate justice activist based in Metro Manila, Philippines, who organises with Youth Advocates for Climate Action Philippines and is active in Fridays for Future International.

    What’s the key climate issue in your community?

    The Philippines is plagued by several impacts from climate change, from droughts that are getting longer and warmer to typhoons that are getting more frequent and more intense. Aside from these climate impacts – that we have not been able to adapt to and leave us with no support when it comes to dealing with the loss and damages – we also face numerous environmentally destructive projects, often undertaken by foreign multinational companies, that our government is allowing and even encouraging.

    Youth Advocates for Climate Action Philippines, the Fridays for Future of the Philippines, advocates for climate justice and to make sure that voices of people from the most affected communities are heard, amplified and given space. I first became an activist in 2017 after working with Indigenous leaders of the Philippines, which made me understand that they only way to achieve a more just and greener society is through collective action leading to system change.

    Have you faced backlash for the work you do?

    Yes, just like anyone who speaks up against injustice and inaction, our government through its paid trolls red-tags and terror-tags activists – it basically calls us terrorists for demanding accountability and pushing for change. There is a fear that comes along with being a climate activist in the Philippines, which has been characterised as the most dangerous country in Asia for environmental defenders and activists for eight years in a row. It’s not just the fear of the climate impacts, it’s also the fear of police and state forces coming to get us and making us disappear. 

    How do you engage with the broader international climate movement?

    I organise a lot with the international community, especially through Fridays for Future – MAPA (Most Affected Peoples and Areas), one of the global south groups of Fridays for Future. We do it by having conversations, learning from each other and creating strategies together, all while having fun. It’s important for the global youth movement to connect with one another, unite and show solidarity in order to truly address the global issue of the climate crisis.

    What hopes, if any, do you have for COP26 to make progress on your issue, and how useful generally do you find such international processes?

    My hope doesn’t lie with the so-called leaders and politicians who have continued business as usual for decades for the profit of the few, usually for the global north. My hope lies in the people: activists and civil society coming together to demand justice and to really expose how this profit-oriented system that brought us to this crisis is not the one that we need to bring us out of it. I think COP26 is a crucial moment and this international process has to be useful because we’ve already had 24 too many. These problems should have been solved at the very first COP, and one way or another we have to make sure that this COP is useful and brings meaningful change, not just more empty promises.

    What one change would you like to see – in the world or in your community – to help address the climate crisis?

    The one change I ask for is a big one: system change. We need to change our system from one that prioritises the overexploitation of the global south and marginalised peoples for the profit of the global north and the privileged few. The way we view development, it shouldn’t be based on GDP and everlasting growth, but rather on the quality of people’s lives. This is doable – but only if we address the climate crisis and all the other socio-economic injustices at its roots.

    Civic space inthe Philippinesis rated as ‘repressedby theCIVICUS Monitor.
    Get in touch with Youth Advocates for Climate Action Philippines through itswebsite or Facebook page, and follow @mitzijonelle onTwitter andInstagram. 

     

  • COP26: ‘The global north must remain accountable and committed to tackle climate change’

    LorenaSosaAs the 26th United Nations Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26) gets underway in Glasgow, UK, CIVICUS continues to interview civil society activists, leaders and experts about the environmental challenges they face in their contexts, the actions they are undertaking to tackle them and their expectations for the summit.

    CIVICUS speaks with Lorena Sosa, Operations Director at Zero Hour, a youth-led movement creating entry points, training and resources for new young activists and organisers. At Zero Hour, Lorena has supported the work of activists in Jamaica, the Philippines and Singapore, looking to create immediate action and bring attention to the impacts of climate change.

     

    What’s the key climate issue in your country that you’re working on?

    Zero Hour is currently committed to eliminating fossil fuel subsidies in US policy and filling the gap in climate-organising resources. We have recently accomplished this by organising the virtual End Polluter Welfare Rally, featuring Senator Majority Lead Chuck Schumer and Congressman Ro Khanna, and the People Not Polluters Rally in New York City, and assisting with the organisation of the People vs Fossil Fuels mobilisation in Washington, DC. We are currently working on revising a series of training activities to help our chapters learn how to organise local campaigns unique to their communities.

    A lot of our actions demonstrate our desire to connect and collaborate with others involved in the movement, to uplift one another’s actions because it is hard to get coverage and attention on the actions that we are all organising. It is a beautiful thing to witness when organisers support each other; love and support is really needed to improve the state of the movement and the progress of its demands.

    Have you faced backlash for the work you do?

    Backlash to activist work certainly ranges on a case-by-case basis, especially for our international chapters, who face limits on protest and rallying because of government restrictions. Within the USA, the biggest backlash against the work we do is tied to the burnout of working and seeing no action from leaders who have the power to initiate action for our planet’s well-being. Burnout is really common in the youth climate space, especially because so many of us are trying to juggle between our academic, social and organising lives while trying to stay hopeful about the change that is possible.

    In terms of staying well and safe from the impacts of burnout, I’ve learned that the best thing to do is engage with the climate community I’m in; I know I’m not alone in the concerns I have because my fellow friends and organisers and I constantly express our concerns to one another. There is no be-all and end-all remedy to burnout, but I’ve learned that taking time to care for myself and connect with my family and friends back home is incredibly helpful in staying grounded.

    How do you engage with the broader international climate movement?

    Our Global Outreach team and Operations team, which are led by Sohayla Eldeeb and myself, have worked together to shape communications with our international chapters in Jamaica, the Philippines and Singapore. We have held one-on-one office hours with our international chapters to help them work through any conflict in their campaign work and provide support in any way possible.

    In terms of international campaigns, our Partnerships Deputy Director, Lana Weidgenant, is actively involved in international campaigns that bring attention to and foster education and action on food systems transformation to eliminate greenhouse gas emissions and protect our environment. Lana served as the Youth Vice Chair of Shifting to Sustainable Consumption Patterns for the United Nations Food Systems Summit 2021, is a youth leader of the international Act4Food Act4Change campaign that has gathered together the food systems pledges and priorities of over 100,000 young people and allies around the world, and is one of the two youth representatives for the COP26 agriculture negotiations this year.

    What hopes, if any, do you have for COP26 to make progress in tackling climate change?

    I would want to see the global north remain accountable and committed to including US$100 billion for the global south to be able to implement their own climate adaptation and mitigation measures successfully.

    So many of our perspectives at Zero Hour are centred around justice, rather than just equity, because we know that the USA is one of the largest contributors to this crisis. Leaders of the global north, especially stakeholders in the USA, need to end support of the fossil fuel industry and start committing to solutions that prioritise people and not polluters.

    I would love to see all leaders attending COP26 take serious and impactful action to combat and eliminate the effects of climate change. Worsened weather patterns and rising sea levels have already proven that inaction is going to be detrimental to the well-being of our planet and all its inhabitants.

    The recent report by the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has demonstrated sufficient evidence for our leaders to treat climate change as the emergency it is. I am hoping that all the global leaders speaking at the conference take the IPCC report’s statements into great consideration when drafting the conference’s outcomes.

    Civic space in the USA is rated ‘obstructed’ by the CIVICUS Monitor.
    Get in touch with Zero Hour through itswebsite and follow@ThisIsZeroHour on Twitter.

     

     

  • COP26: ‘We hope for stricter obligations under the principle of common but differentiated responsibility’

    Charles WanguhuIn the run-up to the 26th United Nations Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26), which will take place in Glasgow, UK between 31 October and 12 November 2021, CIVICUS is interviewing civil society activists, leaders and experts about the environmental challenges they face in their contexts, the actions they are undertaking to tackle them and their expectations for the upcoming summit.

    CIVICUS speaks with Charles Wanguhu, a social activist and coordinator of the Kenya Civil Society Platform on Oil and Gas, a forum in which participating civil society organisations (CSOs) share information, plan and strategise together to conduct joint advocacy, engage with government agencies, companies and the media, and inform and sensitise the public.

    What's the key environmental issue in your country that you're working on?

    The Kenya Civil Society Platform on Oil and Gas is a not-for-profit members’ organisation working towards a sustainable oil and gas sector in Kenya and just energy transitions. With the discovery of oil in Kenya’s Turkana County, our work includes advocating for policy and legal frameworks that ensure environmental justice and climate considerations in developing Kenya’s oil. We do this through policy and regulation reviews and by building the capacity of local communities to participate effectively in environmental and social impact assessment (ESIA) processes to ensure that their environment is safeguarded. 

    We also directly participate in the review of ESIAs, in which we agitate for climate change considerations and environmental protection at the project level. For instance, as Kenya’s Turkana Oil Project is expected to proceed to the production phase, we have participated in the project’s stakeholder consultation forums, where we have raised the need for the project’s ESIA to incorporate climate change impact assessments. We have also been advocating for transparency in the sector through disclosure of petroleum agreements and licences to enable the public to understand the environmental and climate change obligations of oil companies, allowing for increased accountability by the state and these companies.

    Have you faced backlash for the work you do?

    Shrinking civic space remains a challenge in our operating environment. Civil society groups face backlash from government when they speak out about topical issues. These restrictions mostly take the form of refusal of permits for protests or for holding meetings related to projects of concern. In some instances, government agencies such as the Non-Governmental Organisations Coordination Board and Kenya’s revenue authority have been used to target CSOs.

    We also face restrictions from corporate entities, including the deliberate exclusion of CSOs from public participation events. Our members who have expressed concerns or are seen to be vocal about issues related to the extraction of oil and gas resources have found themselves not invited to participate or not allowed to give comments at public hearings.

    How do you connect with the broader international climate movement?

    We are developing a pan-African just transition programme that will involve working with other regional and international groups to ensure that the global energy transition is just for Africa and is reflective of the impacts of the climate crisis on Africa.

    What hopes, if any, do you have for COP26, and how useful generally do you find such international processes?

    Inclusion of climate change considerations at the project level already has a legal hook in Kenya through the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the Paris Agreement and Kenya’s Climate Change Act of 2016. The delayed implementation of the Act has been a challenge, but we are aware of various draft regulations on climate change that are currently under review for eventual enactment.

    Regarding just energy transition, we are hoping for stricter obligations complying with the principle of common but differentiated responsibility, which acknowledges that diverse countries have different responsibilities and capacities to address cross-border issues such as climate change. This would ensure that Africa is not left behind in the transition, or even worse, that the transition does not happen at Africa’s expense.

    International processes have been useful to the extent that they have partly facilitated the domestication of climate change legal and policy frameworks, but we certainly hope for an increased commitment by states.

    What one change would you like to see to help address the climate crisis?

    We would like to see an increase in the speed of the implementation of climate change legal frameworks and obligations both locally and internationally. Further, we would like to see the developed countries of the global north commit to and meet their pledges on climate finance made under the Paris Agreement. This will come in handy to finance just energy transitions in Africa.

    Civic space inKenyais rated ‘obstructedby theCIVICUS Monitor.
    Get in touch with the Kenya Civil Society Platform on Oil and Gas through itswebsite, and follow@KCSPOG and@CharlesWanguhu on Twitter.

     

  • COP26: ‘We hope that at COP26 words will translate into commitments that will change behaviours’

    In the run-up to the 26th United Nations Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26), which will take place in Glasgow, UK between 31 October and 12 November 2021, CIVICUS is interviewing civil society activists, leaders and experts about the environmental challenges they face in their contexts, the actions they are undertaking to tackle them and their expectations for the upcoming summit.

    CIVICUS speaks with Theophile Hatagekimana, Executive Secretary of Rwanda Environment Awareness Organisation (REAO), a Rwandan civil society organisation that works to create awareness about climate change and environmental issues and to promote sound environmental management policies.

    Theophile Hategekimana

    What’s the key environmental issue in your community that you’re working on?

    We work on climate change resilience and mitigation with respect for human rights. In recent years we have started collaborating with government efforts to reduce the amount of fuel used for cooking at the household level. We have joined forces with the Rwandan government in this and other initiatives because they are being very proactive in the area of climate change mitigation.

    Within this project, we teach vulnerable people, including young women, poor women, adolescent single mothers, and victims of sexual abuse, how to use improved cooking methods such as stoves instead of firewood, which not only saves trees and reduces their exposure to toxic emissions in their homes, but also saves them a lot of time. We encourage them to allocate the time saved in the process to self-development activities including education and social interaction, as well as to engage in income-generating activities.

    We also plant trees to restore forests and we plant and distribute agroforestry trees, which make the soil more resilient and able to tackle extreme climatic events such as drought and torrential rain, as well as providing food, forage, industrial raw materials, lumber, fuel, and mulch, helping diversify diets and income. One of our projects focuses on purchasing seeds and planting them in schools, within the framework of a programme that includes ecological literacy, the demonstration of environmental principles by developing green practices on a day-to-day basis, and the development of environmental ethics.

    Though it might seem that we work only on environment protection, we are in fact very concerned with the human rights dimension of environmental protection, so we oppose the practice of displacing people without proper compensation. We raise awareness among the public about their rights as provided in law and support them to claim them when necessary. A case in point is that of the Batwa Indigenous people who are often expelled from their land, so we provide them the tools so that they will know their rights as provided in international and Rwandan law.

    How do you connect with the broader international climate movement?

    Many activists, including myself, maintain personal connections with international organisations and peers around the world. But also at the organisational level, we try to connect with other groups that have a similar mission to ours and take part in climate and environmental networks and coalitions. REAO is a member of the Rwanda Climate Change and Development Network, a national association of environment defenders’ organisations. At the international level, we network with other organisations that work on climate change protection and mitigation, and we have worked in partnership with the International Union for Conservation of Nature and the United Nations Development Programme, among others.

    What hopes, if any, do you have for COP26 to make any progress in climate change mitigation?

    We welcome all international efforts aimed at making coordinated decisions to protect the environment and improve the wellbeing of communities, and we are hopeful that COP26 will result in the adoption of concrete measures to address climate change and environmental degradation. At the discursive level, of course, all that national leaders say on the global stage is exactly what we want to hear; none of it goes against our mission, vision and values. We hope that at COP26 those words will translate into commitments that will result in positive change in their countries’ behaviour on climate issues.

    What one change would you like to see – in the world or in your community – to help address the climate crisis?

    On the global level, we want to see action by the countries that are the biggest polluters aimed at reducing it substantially. Countries like China, India, the USA and others should take clear decisions and act on climate change issues or we will all face the consequences of their inaction. We hope that big polluters will pay for climate solutions and the bill will be settled.

    At the local level, we hope to see the living conditions of less advantaged communities improve and adapt to climate change with the support of government policies and funding.

    Civic space inRwandais rated asrepressedby theCIVICUS Monitor.
    Get in touch with Rwanda Environment Awareness Organisation through itswebsite andFacebook page. 

     

  • COP26: ‘We need a power shift to communities, especially to women, in managing climate resources’

    Nyangori OhenjoIn the run-up to the 26th United Nations Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26), which will take place in Glasgow, UK between 31 October and 12 November 2021, CIVICUS is interviewing civil society activists, leaders and experts about the environmental challenges they face in their contexts, the actions they are undertaking to tackle them and their expectations for the upcoming summit.

    CIVICUS speaks with Nyang'ori Ohenjo, Chief Executive Officer at Centre for Minority Rights Development (CEMIRIDE), a Kenyan civil society organisation that advocates for the recognition of minorities and Indigenous peoples in political, legal and social processes and works to empower communities to obtain sustainable livelihoods.

    What's the key climate issue in your country that you’re working on?

    We focus on the worsening effects of climate change, especially on the most vulnerable, such as Indigenous peoples. Despite a myriad of climate programmes, Kenya is not achieving the desired goals. For instance, increased droughts are currently being experienced in the north of the country, with the usual dire consequences, and the president has already declared this year’s drought a national disaster.

    The overarching challenge is that policy frameworks do not connect with the agenda of Indigenous communities, including pastoralists, forest dwellers and fisher communities, which leaves them and their mainstay economic systems vulnerable and does not bring solutions that enhance their resilience. Programmes and policies often ignore cultural elements.

    Pastoralists, for instance, diversify herds in sex, age and species to spread risks and maximise available pastures. Herd size is balanced against family size, and herd composition is aimed at responding to family needs. Herds are sometimes split as a coping strategy, particularly in times of drought, and to allow an innovative use of available resources. Through mutual support systems, pastoralists take care of each other so they can recover quickly from disaster. Each pastoralist group has a different way of supporting its members, including by finding various ways of earning cash and diversifying livelihoods. However, food aid and handouts have become the policy norm in times of crisis such as the current drought, which makes no economic sense for anyone, least of all the pastoralists.

    Fifty years of a food aid-approach has not provided a sustainable solution, hence the need for a serious policy shift from disaster response, which is reactive, to preparedness, which is proactive. This means putting basic resources in place before crisis hits, including cash if necessary, to get communities through tough times while focusing on long-term investment and development to build communities’ resilience to absorb future shocks.

    How do you connect with the broader international climate movement?

    We engage through various partnerships with numerous global civil society networks, notably CIVICUS, and Kenyan development organisations, grassroots organisations and groups demanding climate action, as well as with academic institutions, United Nations’ agencies and regional and international human rights institutions. The main objective of these engagements is to ensure that the voices of the Indigenous communities of Kenya are heard within the climate change movement and able to influence the international conversations.

    The participation of Indigenous peoples in the international climate movement, and Indigenous peoples being part of a conversation that, in a gender-responsive manner, recognises their rights and values their traditional knowledge as well as their innovative practices for climate resilience, are critical in designing and implementing responsive climate policy and action.

    At the national level, through the Climate Change Directorate, a department of the Kenyan Ministry of Environment and Forestry, and the Climate Smart Agriculture Multistakeholder Platform, CEMIRIDE has taken part in the process of shaping the Kenyan government’s position towards COP26 and within the Local Communities and Indigenous Peoples Platform (LCIPP).

    How are Indigenous communities engaging with the Kenyan government?

    The Ending Drought Emergencies initiative, which ends in 2022, showed success in climate policy development but made little progress in addressing the problem of drought. There is also the National Climate Change Action Plan (2018-2022), which provides for effective engagement and inclusion of marginalised Indigenous communities, but again, has resulted in very little progress in actually ensuring the structured engagement and involvement of these communities in the implementation and monitoring of the National Action Plan.

    The government is also implementing the Kenya Climate Smart Agriculture Project, of which climate mitigation is a key component. Its implementation, however, also lacks structured engagement with Indigenous communities, who therefore have very minimal presence and input into its design and rollout.

    What hopes, if any, do you have for COP26 to make progress on these issues, and how useful generally do you find such international processes?

    International processes like COP26 are important for creating visibility for Indigenous peoples in climate change conversations. While it took a long time for governments, especially in Africa, to recognise the role and need for the voice of Indigenous peoples at the international climate change decision-making table, it is now appreciated that Indigenous peoples can actually influence the direction of these processes. Specifically, the LCIPP was established to promote the exchange of experiences and best practices, build capacity for stakeholder engagement in all process related to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and harness the power of diverse knowledge systems and innovations in designing and implementing climate policy and action.

    CEMIRIDE hopes that the voices of Indigenous peoples will take centre stage and that governments will commit to local solutions that they can be held accountable for rather than make broad global promises that are never fulfilled and they can never be held accountable for. We especially hope that governments will commit to supporting and facilitating the operationalisation of an Indigenous communities’ national engagement framework on climate change actions.

    What one change would you like to see – in the world or in your community – to help address the climate crisis?

    We wish to see a real power shift to communities, and especially to women, in managing climate resources. Indigenous peoples are a unique constituency not only because of the impacts that climate change is having on them but also because of the role they play in ensuring the success of intervention measures and because of the perspectives and experiences they bring on board through their Indigenous and local knowledge. No one knows their community better than the people who live in it and depend on its resources.

    Marginalised Indigenous communities have long developed distinct knowledge and expertise to preserve and conserve the natural environments from which they obtain their livelihoods, and around which have developed their social, cultural, and religious systems and structures. Their direct management of climate resources, therefore, will enable them to positively influence the development, revision, adoption, and implementation of policy and regulations addressing climate change, with a specific emphasis on improving their resilience to climate change impacts.

    Civic space inKenyais rated ‘obstructedby theCIVICUS Monitor.
    Get in touch with the Centre for Minority Rights Development through itswebsite, and follow@CEMIRIDE_KE on Twitter. 

     

  • COP26: ‘Young people are making proposals rather than just demanding change by holding up a sign’

    In the run-up to the 26th United Nations Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26), which will take place in Glasgow, UK between 31 October and 12 November 2021, CIVICUS is interviewing civil society activists, leaders and experts about the environmental challenges they face in their contexts, the actions they are undertaking to tackle them and their expectations for the upcoming summit.

    CIVICUS speaks with Antonella Regular and Joaquín Salinas, Communications Coordinator and Training Coordinator of Juventudes COP Chile (COP Chile Youth), an independent youth platform focused on climate action. The group seeks to create advocacy spaces for young people and be an intergenerational and intersectional space for mutual learning.

    Antonella Regular y Joaquin Salinas

    What are the key environmental problems you encounter in Chile?

    One key problem is that of environmental sacrifice zones or areas with a high level of environmental impact, that is, areas that concentrate a large number of polluting industries that have a direct impact on communities. Another problem is mining and the way in which extractive rights are positioned above the rights of communities and the environment, with operations such as the controversial Dominga project in the Coquimbo region on Chile’s north-central coast. And in the south, the issue of deforestation.

    These environmental issues are our entry point into the communities: they allow us to know what their challenges and goals are so that we can exert influence and act, and not just make demands. Our platform seeks to create solutions to address the problems.

    The fact that young people do not find spaces where they can be heard and actively participate in decision-making is also a problem. Chile is currently going through a constituent process: there is a very diverse and plural Constituent Assembly, which was directly elected by citizens, and which is drafting a new Constitution. For the first time there is the possibility that some historical demands that have been ignored for the longest time will be met. At this decisive moment it is important for young people to be included in decision-making and to be able to influence the design of progressive public policies.

    How do your actions connect with the global climate movement?

    The Juventudes COP Chile platform tries to function as a bridge between civil society and international advocacy spaces such as climate conferences. Our goal is for civil society as a whole to be empowered with opinions and demands to exert influence within these spaces. We have opened spaces for participation and established alliances, and all the proposals that have emerged from these spaces will be delivered to COP26. 

    Juventudes COP Chile promotes the participation of young people and encourages them to take an active position. We are making proposals rather than just demanding change by holding up a sign.

    What progress do you expect from COP26, and more generally, how useful do you find such international processes?

    There are many issues left pending from COP25. For instance, there is a need to finalise the rulebook in relation to article 6 of the Paris Agreement, regarding carbon markets, for states and companies to trade greenhouse gas emissions units. We hope that at COP26, states will finally reach an agreement and there will be a breakthrough in this regard. They should also stop postponing Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) until 2050. And NDCs should no longer be voluntary. The fact that they are almost feels like mockery given the state of the climate crisis.

    Progress is urgently needed because we are seeing that climate change is real and it is happening. Some changes are already irreversible: we are experiencing them on a daily basis in our relationship with the environment and we may hardly be able merely to adopt adaptation rules anymore.

    Parties at COP26 should realise this and put their own interests aside to think about the survival of the human species. They must listen to science and to young people. The participation of young people in these processes cannot be a mere protocol: it must be real, active and meaningful.

    What changes would you like to see in the world or in your community that could help solve the climate crisis?

    In our communities we hope for more participation and access to information. In Chile there is a great deal of centralisation: everything happens in the capital, Santiago de Chile, and that creates a deficit of citizen participation in decision-making and information delivery at the community level. We hope that progress will be made on issues of decentralisation and redistribution of effective decision-making power.

    One of the principles upheld by Juventudes COP Chile is precisely that of decentralisation, and that is why we work with people from different parts of the country. We would like to see a much bigger adoption of some of the practices that we have adopted at Juventudes COP Chile, such as artivism, regenerative culture, horizontal relations and community work.

    At the national level, we hope that politicians will start to take this problem seriously. They must work to reduce pollution and alleviate the climate crisis. They must start by recognising that the climate crisis is a human rights crisis, drastically affecting the quality of life of the most vulnerable people and communities. It is important that there is a recognition that this is happening and that it is a serious problem.

    An important step to start moving forward would be for Chile to finally sign the Regional Agreement on Access to Information, Public Participation and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters in Latin America and the Caribbean, better known as the Escazú Agreement. This is the first regional environmental agreement in Latin America and the Caribbean and the first in the world with specific provisions on human rights and environmental defenders. For years the state of Chile pushed forward the negotiations that resulted in this agreement, but then decided not to sign it. It should do so without delay.

    Civic space in Chile is rated ‘obstructed’ by theCIVICUS Monitor.
    Contact Juventudes COP Chile through theirwebsite or theirFacebook orInstagram pages. 

     

     

  • COP26: “Debemos empoderar a las comunidades y a las mujeres en la gestión de los recursos climáticos”

    Nyangori OhenjoEn vísperas de la 26ª Conferencia de las Partes de las Naciones Unidas sobre el Cambio Climático (COP26), que tendrá lugar en Glasgow, Reino Unido, entre el 31 de octubre y el 12 de noviembre de 2021, CIVICUS está entrevistando a activistas, líderes y personas expertas de la sociedad civil acerca de los desafíos medioambientales que enfrentan en sus contextos, las acciones que están llevando a cabo para abordarlos y sus expectativas para la próxima cumbre.

    CIVICUS conversa con Nyang'ori Ohenjo, director ejecutivo del Centro para el Desarrollo de los Derechos de las Minorías (CEMIRIDE), una organización de la sociedad civil keniana que aboga por el reconocimiento de las minorías y los pueblos indígenas en los procesos políticos, legales y sociales y trabaja para capacitar a las comunidades para obtener medios de vida sostenibles.

     

    ¿Cuál es el problema climático de su país en que se centra su trabajo?

    Nos centramos en los efectos cada vez peores del cambio climático, especialmente sobre los grupos más vulnerables, como los pueblos indígenas. A pesar de que cuenta con una gran cantidad de programas climáticos, Kenia no está logrando los objetivos deseados. Por ejemplo, en el norte del país se está produciendo un aumento de las sequías, con las habituales consecuencias nefastas, y el presidente ya ha declarado la sequía de este año como desastre nacional.

    El desafío principal es que los marcos políticos no conectan con la agenda de las comunidades indígenas, que incluyen a comunidades pastoriles, habitantes de los bosques y comunidades de pescadores. Esto deja a estas comunidades y a sus sistemas económicos en situación de vulnerabilidad y no aporta soluciones que mejoren su resiliencia. Los programas y las políticas suelen ignorar los elementos culturales.

    Los pastores, por ejemplo, diversifican sus rebaños en cuanto a sexo, edad y especie para distribuir los riesgos y maximizar las pasturas disponibles. El tamaño de los rebaños se equilibra con el tamaño de las familias, y la composición de los rebaños busca responder a las necesidades familiares. A veces los rebaños se dividen como estrategia de supervivencia, sobre todo en tiempos de sequía, y para permitir un uso innovador de los recursos disponibles. A través de sistemas de apoyo mutuo, los pastores se cuidan entre sí para poder recuperarse rápidamente de los desastres. Cada grupo de pastores tiene una forma diferente de apoyar a sus miembros, por ejemplo mediante diversas formas de ganar dinero en efectivo y diversificar sus medios de vida. Sin embargo, la ayuda alimentaria y las dádivas se han convertido en la norma política en tiempos de crisis como la actual sequía, lo cual no tiene sentido económico para nadie, y en particular para las comunidades pastoriles.

    En los 50 años en que predominó la perspectiva de la ayuda alimentaria no se logró una solución sostenible; de ahí la necesidad de un verdadero cambio de política, que nos desplace de la respuesta a las catástrofes, que es reactiva, a la preparación, que es proactiva. Esto implica tener a mano una cantidad de recursos básicos, incluido dinero en efectivo de ser necesario, antes de que se produzca la crisis, para ayudar a las comunidades a atravesar los momentos difíciles, al mismo tiempo que se enfoca la atención en la inversión y el desarrollo a largo plazo, de modo de aumentar la resiliencia de las comunidades para absorber futuras crisis.

    ¿Cómo se vinculan con el movimiento internacional por el clima?

    Nos vinculamos a través del trabajo con numerosas redes globales de sociedad civil, entre ellas la de CIVICUS, y con organizaciones de promoción del desarrollo, organizaciones de base y grupos kenianos que reclaman acción por el clima, así como con instituciones académicas, órganos de las Naciones Unidas e instituciones regionales e internacionales de derechos humanos. El principal objetivo de estos vínculos es asegurar que las voces de las comunidades indígenas de Kenia sean escuchadas dentro del movimiento contra el cambio climático y puedan influir en las conversaciones internacionales.

    La participación de los pueblos indígenas en el movimiento internacional por el clima, y el hecho de que los pueblos indígenas formen parte de una conversación que, de manera sensible al género, reconozca sus derechos y valore sus conocimientos tradicionales, así como sus prácticas innovadoras en materia de resiliencia climática, son fundamentales para diseñar y aplicar políticas y acciones climáticas eficaces.

    A nivel nacional, a través de la Dirección de Cambio Climático, un departamento del Ministerio de Medio Ambiente y Silvicultura de Kenia, y de la Plataforma Multisectorial de Agricultura Inteligente para el Clima, CEMIRIDE ha participado en el proceso en que se estableció la posición del gobierno keniano de cara a la COP26 y dentro de la Plataforma de Comunidades Locales y Pueblos Indígenas (Plataforma CLPI).

    ¿Cómo interactúan las comunidades indígenas con el gobierno de Kenia?

    La iniciativa contra las emergencias por sequía, que finaliza en 2022, ha tenido éxito a la hora de desarrollar políticas climáticas, pero ha avanzado poco en la resolución del problema de la sequía. También está el Plan de Acción Nacional sobre Cambio Climático (2018-2022), que prevé la participación e inclusión efectivas de las comunidades indígenas marginadas, pero, nuevamente, ha resultado en muy pocos avances en términos de asegurar una participación estructurada y significativa de estas comunidades en la implementación y el seguimiento del Plan de Acción Nacional.

    El gobierno también está implementando el Proyecto de Agricultura Climáticamente Inteligente de Kenia, uno de cuyos componentes clave es la mitigación del clima. Sin embargo, su implementación carece de mecanismos estructurados de vinculación con las comunidades indígenas, las cuales por lo tanto tienen mínima presencia y capacidad de aportar a su diseño y puesta en marcha.

    ¿Qué esperanzas tiene de que la COP26 avance en estas cuestiones, y qué utilidad considera que suelen tener estos procesos internacionales?

    Estos procesos internacionales como la COP26 son importantes para dar visibilidad a los pueblos indígenas en las conversaciones sobre el cambio climático. Aunque los gobiernos, y especialmente los de África, tardaron mucho tiempo en reconocer el rol de los pueblos indígenas y la necesidad de que sus voces sean escuchadas en la mesa internacional de toma de decisiones sobre el cambio climático, ahora han entendido que los pueblos indígenas pueden realmente influir en la dirección de estos procesos. En concreto, la Plataforma CLPI fue creada para promover el intercambio de experiencias y buenas prácticas, crear capacidad para la participación de las partes interesadas en todos los procesos relacionados con la Convención Marco de las Naciones Unidas sobre el Cambio Climático y aprovechar los diversos sistemas de conocimiento y sus innovaciones para el diseño y la implementación de políticas y acciones por el clima.

    CEMIRIDE espera que las voces de los pueblos indígenas ocupen el centro de la escena y que los gobiernos se comprometan a implementar soluciones locales por las cuales deban rendir cuentas, en vez de hacer amplias promesas globales que nunca se cumplen y de las cuales nadie les exige rendición de cuentas. En especial, esperamos que los gobiernos se comprometan a apoyar y facilitar la puesta en marcha de un marco nacional para la participación de las comunidades indígenas en acciones relativas al cambio climático.

    ¿Qué cambio le gustaría ver -en el mundo o en su comunidad- que ayudaría a resolver la crisis climática?

    Queremos que ocurra una verdadera devolución de poder a las comunidades, y especialmente a las mujeres, en la gestión de los recursos climáticos. Los pueblos indígenas son colectivos únicos no solamente por los impactos que el cambio climático está teniendo sobre ellos, sino también por el rol que desempeñan a la hora de asegurar el éxito de las medidas de intervención y por las perspectivas y experiencias que aportan a través de sus conocimientos indígenas y locales. Nadie conoce mejor una comunidad que las personas que viven en ella y dependen de sus recursos.

    Las comunidades indígenas marginadas han desarrollado desde hace mucho tiempo conocimientos y experiencia específicos para preservar y conservar los entornos naturales de donde obtienen su sustento, y en torno a los cuales han desarrollado sus sistemas y estructuras sociales, culturales y religiosas. Por lo tanto, su gestión directa de los recursos climáticos les permitirá influir positivamente sobre el desarrollo, la revisión, la adopción y la implementación de políticas y regulaciones que aborden el cambio climático, con un énfasis específico en el mejoramiento de su resiliencia frente a los impactos del cambio climático.

    El espacio cívico enKenia es calificado como “obstruidopor elCIVICUS Monitor.
    Póngase en contacto con el Centro para el Desarrollo de los Derechos de las Minorías a través de supágina web y siga a@CEMIRIDE_KE en Twitter.

     

     

  • COP26: “El norte global debe rendir cuentas y comprometerse con la lucha contra el cambio climático”

    LorenaSosaMientras la 26ª Conferencia de las Partes de las Naciones Unidas sobre el Cambio Climático (COP26) se pone en marcha en Glasgow, Reino Unido, CIVICUS continúa entrevistando a activistas, líderes y personas expertas de la sociedad civil sobre los desafíos medioambientales que enfrentan en sus contextos, las acciones que están llevando a cabo para abordarlos y sus expectativas para la cumbre. 
    CIVICUS conversa con Lorena Sosa, directora de operaciones de Zero Hour, un movimiento dirigido por jóvenes que busca generar vías de acceso, ofrece formación y distribuye recursos para nuevos activistas y organizadores jóvenes. A través de Zero Hour, Lorena ha apoyado el trabajo de activistas de Jamaica, Filipinas y Singapur, buscando generar acción inmediata y llamar la atención sobre los impactos del cambio climático.

    ¿Cuál es el problema climático de tu país en que trabaja tu organización?

    Actualmente, Zero Hour está abocada a la eliminación de los subsidios a los combustibles fósiles en la política estadounidense y busca subsanar la ausencia de recursos para la organización y movilización por el clima. Recientemente hemos logrado organizar una manifestación virtual, “End Polluter Welfare” (“Acabemos con el Estado de bienestar para los contaminadores”), que contó con la participación del senador líder de la mayoría Chuck Schumer y el diputado Ro Khanna, así como una movilización llamada “People Not Polluters” (“La gente contra los contaminadores”) en la ciudad de Nueva York. También ayudamos a organizar la movilización “People vs Fossil Fuels” (“La gente contra los combustibles fósiles”) en Washington DC. Actualmente estamos trabajando en la revisión de una serie de actividades de formación para ayudar a nuestros capítulos a aprender a organizar campañas locales específicas para sus comunidades.

    Muchas de nuestras acciones expresan nuestro deseo de vincularnos y colaborar con otras personas involucradas en el movimiento para elevar las acciones de los demás, porque es difícil conseguir cobertura y atención para las acciones que todos estamos organizando. Es muy lindo ver a los y las activistas apoyarse mutuamente; el amor y el apoyo son realmente necesarios para mejorar el estado del movimiento e impulsar sus reivindicaciones.

    ¿Han enfrentado a reacciones negativas por el trabajo que hacen?

    La reacción contra el trabajo de los activistas varía ampliamente, especialmente en el caso de nuestras secciones internacionales, que enfrentan límites a las protestas y movilizaciones a causa de restricciones gubernamentales. En Estados Unidos, el principal efecto negativo del trabajo que realizamos está relacionado con el agotamiento que resulta de trabajar sin ver ninguna acción por parte de los líderes que tienen el poder de iniciar acciones para el bien de nuestro planeta. El agotamiento es muy común en el movimiento juvenil por el clima, sobre todo porque muchos de nosotros estamos tratando de hacer malabares con nuestras obligaciones académicas, nuestra vida social y nuestro activismo mientras tratamos de mantener viva la esperanza de que el cambio es posible.

    En lo que respecta a conservar el bienestar y mantenerse a salvo de los impactos del agotamiento, he aprendido que lo mejor es comprometerme con la comunidad climática de la que formo parte; sé que no estoy sola con mis preocupaciones porque mantengo constantes intercambios acerca de ellas con mis amigos y colegas. No hay un remedio universal para el agotamiento, pero he aprendido que dedicar tiempo a cuidarme y a mantener el vínculo con mi familia y mis amigos es increíblemente útil para mantener los pies en la tierra.

    ¿Cómo te vinculas con el movimiento internacional por el clima?

    Nuestros equipos de vínculos globales y Operaciones, liderados por Sohayla Eldeeb y por mí, han trabajado juntos para dar forma a nuestras comunicaciones con nuestros capítulos internacionales en Jamaica, Filipinas y Singapur. Hemos mantenido horas de consulta específicas para nuestras secciones internacionales para poder ayudarles a resolver todo conflicto que se les presentara en su trabajo de campaña y proporcionarles apoyo en todo lo que pudiéramos.

    En cuanto a las campañas internacionales, nuestra directora adjunta de Asociaciones, Lana Weidgenant, participa activamente en campañas internacionales que buscan llamar la atención y fomentar la educación y la acción sobre la transformación de los sistemas alimentarios para eliminar las emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero y proteger nuestro medio ambiente. Lana fue vicepresidenta juvenil de Transición hacia Patrones de Consumo Sustentables para la Cumbre de Sistemas Alimentarios de las Naciones Unidas de 2021, es una de las líderes juveniles de la campaña internacional Act4Food Act4Change (“Actúa por los alimentos, actúa por el cambio”) que ha recolectado los compromisos y las prioridades relativas a los sistemas alimentarios de más de 100.000 jóvenes y aliados de todo el mundo, y es una de las dos representantes juveniles en las negociaciones agrícolas de la COP26 de este año.

    ¿Qué esperanzas tienes de que la COP26 logre avances en la lucha contra el cambio climático?

    Me gustaría que el norte global rinda cuentas y se comprometa a aportar 100.000 millones de dólares para que el sur global pueda implementar con éxito sus propias medidas de adaptación y mitigación del cambio climático.

    Muchas de nuestras perspectivas en Zero Hour se centran en la justicia, más que en la equidad, porque sabemos que Estados Unidos es uno de los mayores causantes de esta crisis. Los líderes del norte global, y especialmente los actores clave en los Estados Unidos, tienen que dejar de apoyar a la industria de los combustibles fósiles y empezar a comprometerse con soluciones que den prioridad a las personas más que a los contaminadores.

    Me encantaría que todos los líderes que asistan a la COP26 tomaran medidas serias y contundentes para combatir y eliminar los efectos del cambio climático. El empeoramiento de los patrones meteorológicos y la subida del nivel del mar ya han demostrado que la inacción va a ser perjudicial para el bienestar de nuestro planeta y de todos sus habitantes.

    El reciente informe del Grupo Intergubernamental de Expertos sobre el Cambio Climático (IPCC) de las Naciones Unidas ha destacado que existen pruebas suficientes para que nuestros dirigentes traten el cambio climático como la emergencia que es. Espero que todos los líderes mundiales que participen en la conferencia tengan muy en cuenta las conclusiones del informe del IPCC a la hora de redactar los resultados de la conferencia.

    El espacio cívico en Estados Unidos es calificado como “obstruido” por elCIVICUS Monitor.
    Póngase en contacto con Zero Hour a través de supágina web y siga a@ThisIsZeroHour en Twitter.

     

  • COP26: “En respuesta a la presión desde abajo, deben responder con acciones justas por el clima”

    En vísperas de la 26ª Conferencia de las Partes de las Naciones Unidas sobre el Cambio Climático (COP26), que tendrá lugar en Glasgow, Reino Unido, entre el 31 de octubre y el 12 de noviembre de 2021, CIVICUS está entrevistando a activistas, líderes y personas expertas de la sociedad civil acerca de los desafíos medioambientales que enfrentan en sus contextos, las acciones que están llevando a cabo para abordarlos y sus expectativas para la próxima cumbre.

    CIVICUS conversa con Caroline Owashaba, jefa de equipo de Acción por el Desarrollo Juvenil Uganda (Action for Youth Development Uganda) y coordinadora voluntaria de la Alianza Niñas, no novias (Girls Not Brides) en Uganda.

    Caroline Owashaba

    ¿Cuál es el problema medioambiental de su país en el que está trabajando?

    Un problema clave en Uganda es el uso de grandes cantidades de bolsas de plástico de un solo uso, que tienen efectos medioambientales extremos. Las bolsas de plástico tardan muchos años en descomponerse; liberan sustancias tóxicas en el suelo y, cuando son quemadas, en el aire; obstruyen los desagües y pueden provocar inundaciones; y matan a los animales que las comen confundiéndolas con alimento o que se enredan en ellas.

    En 2018 se aprobó una medida para prohibir la fabricación, la venta y el uso de bolsas de plástico, pero los fabricantes presionaron mucho para que les dieran más tiempo hasta la entrada en vigor de la prohibición, y en consecuencia su implementación ha sido lenta y en gran medida ineficaz. Así que, a principios de 2021, el gobierno decidió aplicar nuevas medidas en el mismo sentido, junto con un paquete más amplio de medidas medioambientales.

    Mientras el gobierno trabaja para hacer cumplir la prohibición de las bolsas de plástico de un solo uso, nosotros estamos trabajando en una iniciativa para producir materiales alternativos, ecológicos y biodegradables. Esto es bastante urgente, porque ahora mismo, si la prohibición de las bolsas de plástico realmente se implementara, la oferta de opciones de envases biodegradables no sería en absoluto suficiente.

    Acción por el Desarrollo Juvenil Uganda (ACOYDE, por sus siglas en inglés) está desarrollando un proyecto denominado CHACHA (Niños por el Cambio Alternativo), que utiliza la fibra del plátano para fabricar diversos artículos útiles, tales como felpudos e individuales para mesas, almohadas, artículos de decoración interior y, por supuesto, bolsas. Los residuos generados en la extracción de la fibra del plátano y la fabricación de estos artículos se reciclan para producir briquetas de carbón de alta calidad que los jóvenes y las mujeres que participan en el proyecto utilizan como fuente de calor tanto en sus hogares como en sus lugares de trabajo, reduciendo el consumo de combustible y aumentando al mismo tiempo sus ingresos familiares.

    Toda la comunidad participa en el proceso de producción, porque es la que provee los tallos de plátano. Y el proyecto permite a los jóvenes, y especialmente a las mujeres jóvenes, mantener a sus familias. Tenemos posibilidades de expansión, ya que el surgimiento de hoteles ecológicos ha creado una mayor demanda de productos sustentables.

    ¿Cómo se vinculan con el movimiento internacional por el clima?

    Nos hemos vinculado con el movimiento internacional a través de intercambios regionales sobre el cambio climático tales como la Semana Africana del Cambio Climático, y como parte de la Red Juvenil de Agricultura Climáticamente Inteligente. También seguimos los debates del Grupo de Países Menos Adelantados (PMA) sobre adaptación, mitigación y financiamiento.

    También ha funcionado a la inversa: ACOYDE ha apoyado los esfuerzos para domesticar el marco climático internacional y ha impulsado el proyecto de ley nacional sobre cambio climático, que se aprobó en abril de 2021. Esta iniciativa dio fuerza de ley a la Convención Marco de las Naciones Unidas sobre el Cambio Climático (CMNUCC) y al Acuerdo de París, del cual Uganda es signataria. A continuación, trabajamos para bajar la ley al nivel local. Es clave que la legislación se implemente efectivamente a nivel local, porque nos ayudará a superar las injusticias del cambio climático en nuestras comunidades.

    También nos conectamos con el movimiento por el clima más amplio desde una perspectiva de género. Personalmente me interesan las intersecciones entre el género y el cambio climático. En las COP anteriores pude contribuir al Plan de Acción de Género (PAG), que ha guiado y ejercido influencia en temas de género y juventud en los procesos de negociación de la CMNUCC. Participé en los debates sobre los avances del PAG en relación con el equilibrio de género, la coherencia, la aplicación con perspectiva de género, el seguimiento y la presentación de informes. También he participado activamente en el Grupo de Trabajo Nacional de Género de Uganda y en otros procesos nacionales sobre cambio climático para garantizar la domesticación de las normas globales de género y un financiamiento consistente con el Acuerdo de París, entre otras cosas informando sobre la implementación de las disposiciones del PAG en Uganda.

    ¿Cuáles son sus expectativas para la COP26?

    La COP26 debería ofrecer espacios para llevar las cuestiones de género a nivel global y proporcionar más oportunidades de debate. Debería aumentar la participación de las mujeres, emprender la integración de la perspectiva de género y garantizar la implementación del PAG. Debe contribuir a amplificar las voces de las mujeres en las negociaciones sobre el cambio climático. Las mujeres están haciendo gran parte del trabajo pesado a nivel de base, pero reciben muy poco a cambio, no sólo porque es muy poco lo que llega a sus bolsillos, sino también porque siguen estando subrepresentadas y, por tanto, sus voces no son escuchadas.

    Los foros internacionales como la COP26 deben proporcionar espacios para la participación de las bases y, en respuesta a esas presiones desde abajo, deben desarrollar intervenciones sólidas para una acción climática justa y respetuosa de los derechos humanos, incluidos los derechos de los pueblos indígenas y la promoción de la igualdad de género. 

    Elespacio cívico en Uganda es calificado comorepresivopor elCIVICUS Monitor.
    Póngase en contacto con Acción para el Desarrollo Juvenil Uganda a través de susitio web y de su página deFacebook.

     

  • COP26: “Esperamos obligaciones más estrictas bajo el principio de responsabilidad común pero diferenciada”

    Charles WanguhuEn vísperas de la 26ª Conferencia de las Partes de las Naciones Unidas sobre el Cambio Climático (COP26), que tendrá lugar en Glasgow, Reino Unido, entre el 31 de octubre y el 12 de noviembre de 2021, CIVICUS está entrevistando a activistas, líderes y personas expertas de la sociedad civil acerca de los desafíos medioambientales que enfrentan en sus contextos, las acciones que están llevando a cabo para abordarlos y sus expectativas para la próxima cumbre.

    CIVICUS conversa conCharles Wanguhu, activista social y coordinador de la Plataforma de la Sociedad Civil de Kenia sobre el Petróleo y el Gas, un foro donde las organizaciones de la sociedad civil (OSC) participantes comparten información, planifican y elaboran estrategias comunes para llevar a cabo una labor de incidencia conjunta, se vinculan con organismos gubernamentales, empresas y medios de comunicación, e informan y concientizan a la ciudadanía.

    ¿Cuál es el problema medioambiental de su país en el cual está trabajando?

    La Plataforma de la Sociedad Civil de Kenia sobre el Petróleo y el Gas es una organización de membresía sin ánimo de lucro que trabaja por la sostenibilidad del sector del petróleo y el gas en Kenia y por transiciones energéticas justas. Con el descubrimiento de petróleo en el condado keniano de Turkana, nuestro trabajo pasó a incluir la incidencia en favor de marcos políticos y legales que garanticen la justicia medioambiental y las consideraciones climáticas en el desarrollo del petróleo. Hacemos este trabajo a través de la revisión de políticas y normativas y el desarrollo de capacidades para que las comunidades locales puedan participar de forma efectiva en los procesos de evaluación del impacto ambiental y social (EIAS) y así salvaguardar su entorno. 

    También participamos directamente en la revisión de las EIAS, abogando siempre por la inclusión de las consideraciones relativas al cambio climático y la protección del medio ambiente a nivel de proyecto. Por ejemplo, a medida que el proyecto petrolero de Turkana se fue acercando a la fase de producción, hemos participado en los foros de consulta con las partes interesadas del proyecto, donde hemos planteado la necesidad de que la EIAS del proyecto incorpore evaluaciones de impacto en materia de cambio climático. También hemos abogado por la transparencia en el sector mediante la divulgación de los acuerdos y licencias petroleras para que la ciudadanía pueda entender las obligaciones de las empresas petroleras en materia de medio ambiente y cambio climático, lo cual redundará en una mayor rendición de cuentas por parte del Estado y de estas empresas.

    ¿Han enfrentado reacciones negativas por el trabajo que hacen?

    La reducción del espacio cívico sigue siendo un desafío en el entorno en que trabajamos. Los grupos de la sociedad civil enfrentan reacciones negativas del gobierno cuando se refieren a temas de actualidad. Las restricciones suelen consistir en la denegación de permisos para realizar protestas o celebrar reuniones relacionadas con los proyectos de su interés. En algunos casos, organismos gubernamentales como la Junta de Coordinación de Organizaciones No Gubernamentales y la autoridad impositiva de Kenia han sido utilizados para atacar a las OSC.

    También enfrentamos restricciones por parte de las empresas, tales como la exclusión deliberada de las OSC de eventos de participación pública. Aquellos de nuestros miembros que han expresado su preocupación o se han hecho oír en cuestiones relacionadas con la extracción de recursos gasíferos y petroleros se han encontrado con que ya no se les invita a participar o no se les permite hacer comentarios en las audiencias públicas.

    ¿Cómo se vinculan con el movimiento internacional por el clima?

    Estamos desarrollando un programa panafricano para una transición justa que implicará la colaboración con otros grupos regionales e internacionales para garantizar que la transición energética mundial sea justa para África y refleje los impactos de la crisis climática en el continente.

     

    ¿Qué esperanzas tiene en relación con la COP26, y qué utilidad considera que suelen tener estos procesos internacionales?

    La inclusión de consideraciones sobre el cambio climático a nivel de proyecto ya tiene un asidero legal en Kenia a través de la Convención Marco de las Naciones Unidas sobre el Cambio Climático, el Acuerdo de París y la Ley de Cambio Climático aprobada en Kenia en 2016. El retraso en la implementación de la ley ha supuesto un desafío, pero tenemos conocimiento de varios proyectos de reglamentación que están siendo revisados para su eventual promulgación.

    En lo que respecta a la transición energética justa, esperamos que se impongan obligaciones más estrictas que cumplan con el principio de responsabilidad común pero diferenciada, el cual reconoce que los distintos países tienen diferentes responsabilidades y capacidades para abordar cuestiones transfronterizas tales como el cambio climático. Esto garantizaría que África no se quede atrás en la transición o, lo que es peor, que la transición no se produzca a sus expensas.

    Los procesos internacionales han sido útiles en la medida en que han facilitado en parte la domesticación de los marcos legales y políticos sobre cambio climático, pero ciertamente esperamos un mayor compromiso por parte de los Estados.

    ¿Qué cambio le gustaría que ocurriera para ayudar a resolver la crisis climática?

    Quisiéramos que se acelerara la implementación de los marcos jurídicos y las obligaciones en materia de cambio climático, a nivel tanto local como internacional. Además, quisiéramos que los países desarrollados del norte global se comprometieran y cumplieran sus promesas de financiamiento para el clima realizadas en el marco del Acuerdo de París. Esto será muy útil para financiar transiciones energéticas justas en África.

    El espacio cívico enKenia es calificado comoobstruidopor elCIVICUS Monitor.
    Póngase en contacto con la Plataforma de la Sociedad Civil de Kenia sobre el Petróleo y el Gas a través de supágina web y siga a@KCSPOG y a@CharlesWanguhu en Twitter. 

     

  • COP26: “Esperamos que las palabras se traduzcan en compromisos que cambien las conductas”

    En vísperas de la 26ª Conferencia de las Partes de las Naciones Unidas sobre el Cambio Climático (COP26), que tendrá lugar en Glasgow, Reino Unido, entre el 31 de octubre y el 12 de noviembre de 2021, CIVICUS está entrevistando a activistas, líderes y personas expertas de la sociedad civil acerca de los desafíos medioambientales que enfrentan en sus contextos, las acciones que están llevando a cabo para abordarlos y sus expectativas para la próxima cumbre.

    CIVICUS conversa con Theophile Hatagekimana, Secretario Ejecutivo de la Organización para la Concientización Medioambiental de Ruanda (REAO), una organización de la sociedad civil ruandesa que trabaja para crear conciencia acerca del cambio climático y los problemas medioambientales y promueve la implementación de políticas sólidas de gestión ambiental.

    Theophile Hategekimana

    ¿Cuál es el principal problema medioambiental de su comunidad en el que está trabajando?

    Trabajamos en la resiliencia y la mitigación del cambio climático con respeto de los derechos humanos. En los últimos años hemos empezado a colaborar con los esfuerzos del gobierno para reducir la cantidad de combustible utilizado para cocinar en los hogares. Hemos unido fuerzas en esta y otras iniciativas porque el gobierno ruandés está siendo muy proactivo en el tema de la mitigación del cambio climático.

    En el marco de este proyecto, enseñamos a personas vulnerables, incluidas mujeres jóvenes, mujeres pobres, madres solteras adolescentes y víctimas de abusos sexuales, a utilizar métodos mejorados para cocinar, tales como estufas, en lugar de leña, lo cual no solamente salva de la tala a muchos árboles y reduce la exposición de estas personas a emisiones tóxicas en sus hogares, sino que también les ahorra mucho tiempo. Las animamos a que destinen el tiempo que esto les ahorra a actividades de autodesarrollo, educativas y de interacción social, y a que realicen actividades generadoras de ingresos.

    También plantamos árboles para restaurar los bosques y plantamos y distribuimos árboles agroforestales, que hacen que el suelo sea más resistente y pueda hacer frente a fenómenos climáticos extremos tales como sequías y lluvias torrenciales, además de proporcionar alimento, forraje, materias primas industriales, madera, combustible y mantillo, ayudando a diversificar las dietas y los ingresos. Uno de nuestros proyectos se centra en la compra de semillas y su siembra en las escuelas, en el marco de un programa que incluye la alfabetización ecológica, la demostración de los principios medioambientales mediante el desarrollo de prácticas verdes en la vida cotidiana, y el desarrollo de una ética medioambiental.

    Aunque pueda parecer que solamente trabajamos en la protección ambiental, en realidad nos preocupa mucho la dimensión de derechos humanos de la protección del medio ambiente, por lo cual nos oponemos a la práctica de desplazar gente sin la debida compensación. Concientizamos a la población sobre los derechos que les reconoce la ley y la apoyamos para que los reclame cuando sea necesario. Un ejemplo es el de los indígenas batwa, que a menudo son expulsados de sus tierras, por lo que les proporcionamos las herramientas necesarias para que conozcan sus derechos, tal y como los enuncian el derecho internacional y la ley ruandesa.

    ¿Cómo se vinculan con el movimiento internacional por el clima?

    Muchos activistas, entre los cuales me incluyo, mantienen conexiones personales con organizaciones internacionales y con pares de todo el mundo. Pero también a nivel organizativo intentamos conectarnos con otros grupos que tienen una misión similar a la nuestra y participamos en redes y coaliciones climáticas y medioambientales. REAO es miembro de la Red de Cambio Climático y Desarrollo de Ruanda, una asociación nacional de organizaciones defensoras del medio ambiente. A nivel internacional, trabajamos en red con otras organizaciones que se dedican a la protección y mitigación del cambio climático, y hemos colaborado con la Unión Internacional para la Conservación de la Naturaleza y el Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo, entre otros.

    ¿Qué esperanzas tiene de que la COP26 logre algún avance en la mitigación del cambio climático?

    Acogemos con satisfacción todos los esfuerzos internacionales encaminados a tomar decisiones coordinadas para proteger el medio ambiente y mejorar el bienestar de las comunidades, y tenemos la esperanza de que la COP26 dé lugar a la adopción de medidas concretas para hacer frente al cambio climático y a la degradación del medio ambiente. A nivel discursivo, por supuesto, todo lo que dicen los líderes de los países en el escenario global es exactamente lo que queremos escuchar; nada de eso va en contra de nuestra misión, visión y valores. Esperamos que en la COP26 esas palabras se traduzcan en compromisos que den lugar a un cambio positivo en el comportamiento de sus países en materia climática.

    ¿Qué cambio le gustaría ver -en el mundo o en su comunidad- para ayudar a resolver la crisis climática?

    A nivel mundial, queremos que los países que más contaminan actúen para reducir sustancialmente sus emisiones. Países como China, India, Estados Unidos y otros deben tomar decisiones claras y actuar en materia de cambio climático, o todos padeceremos las consecuencias de su inacción. Esperamos que los grandes contaminadores paguen las soluciones climáticas y la cuenta quede saldada.

    A nivel local, esperamos que las condiciones de vida de las comunidades menos favorecidas mejoren y logren adaptarse al cambio climático con el apoyo de políticas públicas adecuadas y financiamiento de los gobiernos.

    El espacio cívico enRuanda es calificado como “represivopor elCIVICUS Monitor.
    Póngase en contacto con la Organización para la Concientización Medioambiental de Ruanda a través de susitio web y su página deFacebook. 

     

  • COP26: “La juventud está presentando propuestas, no se limita a exigir cambios sosteniendo un cartel”

    En vísperas de la 26ª Conferencia de las Partes de las Naciones Unidas sobre el Cambio Climático (COP26), que tendrá lugar en Glasgow, Reino Unido, entre el 31 de octubre y el 12 de noviembre de 2021, CIVICUS está entrevistando a activistas, líderes y expertos de la sociedad civil sobre los desafíos medioambientales que enfrentan en sus contextos, las acciones que están llevando a cabo para abordarlos y sus expectativas respecto de la próxima cumbre.

    CIVICUS conversa con Antonella Regular y Joaquín Salinas, respectivamente Coordinadora de Comunicación y Coordinador del área de Formación de Juventudes COP Chile, una plataforma independiente de jóvenes enfocada en la acción climática. La agrupación busca generar espacios de incidencia para la población juvenil y es un espacio intergeneracional e interseccional de enseñanza mutua.

    Antonella Regular y Joaquin Salinas

    ¿Cuáles son los principales problemas ambientales en Chile?

    Un problema de base corresponde directamente a las zonas de sacrificio medioambiental o con un alto nivel de impacto ambiental, es decir, áreas que concentran una gran cantidad de industrias contaminantes que tienen un impacto directo sobre las comunidades. Otro problema es la minería y la forman en que los derechos de extracción se posicionan sobre los derechos de las comunidades y el medio ambiente, con explotaciones como la del controversial proyecto Dominga en la región de Coquimbo, en la costa centro-norte de Chile. Y en el sur, el tema de la deforestación.

    Estas problemáticas ambientales son nuestra vía de entrada en las comunidades: nos permiten conocer cuáles son los desafíos y las metas para poder incidir y accionar, y no solamente exigir. Desde la plataforma buscamos generar soluciones para los problemas.

    El hecho de que los jóvenes no encuentren espacios donde sean escuchados y puedan participar activamente en la toma de decisiones también es un problema. Ahora Chile está pasando por un proceso constituyente: tenemos una Asamblea Constituyente muy diversa y plural, elegida directamente por la ciudadanía, que está redactando una nueva Constitución. Por primera vez existe la posibilidad de que algunas demandas históricas que fueron ignoradas durante mucho tiempo sean atendidas. En este momento decisivo es importante que los jóvenes sean incluidos en la toma de decisiones y que puedan incidir en el diseño de políticas públicas progresistas.

    ¿Cómo se conectan sus acciones con el movimiento global por el clima?

    La plataforma Juventudes COP Chile trata de ser un puente entre la sociedad civil y los espacios de incidencia internacionales como las conferencias climáticas. Nuestro objetivo es la sociedad civil en su conjunto se empodere con opiniones y exigencias para incidir en estos espacios. Hemos abierto espacios de participación y generado alianzas, y todas las propuestas que han surgido en esos espacios serán entregadas a la COP26. 

    Juventudes COP Chile promueve la participación de los jóvenes y los incita a tomar una posición activa. Estamos presentando propuestas, no nos limitamos a exigir cambios sosteniendo un cartel.

    ¿Qué avances esperan de la COP26? Más en general, ¿qué utilidad les ven a estos procesos internacionales?

    Hay muchos asuntos que quedaron pendientes de la COP25. Por ejemplo, cerrar el libro de reglas en relación con el artículo 6 del Acuerdo de París, relativo a los mercados de carbono, para que estados y empresas intercambien unidades de emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero. Esperamos que en esta COP los países se pongan de acuerdo de una vez y haya un gran avance en ese sentido. También deberían dejar de aplazar las Contribuciones Determinadas a Nivel Nacional (NDC) hasta el 2050. Y las NDC deberían dejar de ser voluntarias. Esto parece casi una burla teniendo en cuenta el estado de la crisis climática.

    Es urgente que haya avances porque estamos viendo que el cambio climático es real y está ocurriendo. Algunos cambios son ya irreversibles: los estamos experimentando diariamente en nuestro relacionamiento con el medio ambiente y es posible que apenas podamos ya adoptar normas de adaptación.

    Las partes participantes de la COP26 deberían darse cuenta de eso y dejar sus intereses de lado para pensar en la supervivencia de la especie humana. Deben escuchar a la ciencia y a los jóvenes. La participación de los jóvenes en estos procesos no puede ser un mero protocolo: debe ser real, activa y significativa.

    ¿Qué cambios les gustaría ver, en el mundo o en su comunidad, que puedan ayudar a resolver la crisis climática?

    En nuestras comunidades esperamos una mayor participación y acceso a la información. En Chile hay una gran centralización: todo ocurre en la capital, Santiago de Chile, y eso genera un déficit de participación ciudadana en la toma de decisiones y de entrega de información en las comunidades. Esperamos que se avance en temas de descentralización y redistribución de poder efectivo de toma de decisiones.

    Uno de los principios de Juventudes COP Chile es precisamente la descentralización, y por eso trabajamos con personas de diferentes partes del país. Nos gustaría ver una adopción más masiva de algunas de las prácticas que integramos en Juventudes COP, tales como el artivismo, la cultura regenerativa, la horizontalidad y el trabajo comunitario.

    A nivel nacional, esperamos que los políticos empiecen a tomarse este problema en serio. Tienen que trabajar para reducir la contaminación y paliar la crisis climática. Deben partir del reconocimiento de que la crisis climática es una crisis de derechos humanos, que afecta drásticamente la calidad de vida de las personas y las comunidades más vulnerables. Es importante que haya un reconocimiento de que esto está ocurriendo y de que es un problema grave.

    Un paso importante para empezar a andar sería que Chile finalmente firme el Acuerdo Regional sobre el Acceso a la Información, la Participación Pública y el Acceso a la Justicia en Asuntos Ambientales en América Latina y el Caribe, más conocido como Acuerdo de Escazú. Este es el primer acuerdo regional ambiental de América Latina y el Caribe y el primero en el mundo con disposiciones específicas sobre personas defensoras de derechos humanos y del medio ambiente. Durante años Chile impulsó las negociaciones que resultaron en este acuerdo, pero luego decidió no firmarlo. Debería hacerlo sin demoras.

    El espacio cívico en Chile es calificado como “obstruido” por elCIVICUS Monitor.
    Póngase en contacto con Juventudes COP Chile a través de susitio web o sus páginas deFacebook oInstagram.

     

  • COP26: “Las comunidades marginadas deben estar en el centro de la acción por el clima”

    En vísperas de la 26ª Conferencia de las Partes de las Naciones Unidas sobre el Cambio Climático (COP26), que tendrá lugar en Glasgow, Reino Unido, entre el 31 de octubre y el 12 de noviembre de 2021, CIVICUS está entrevistando a activistas, líderes y personas expertas de la sociedad civil acerca de los desafíos medioambientales que enfrentan en sus contextos, las acciones que están llevando a cabo para abordarlos y sus expectativas para la próxima cumbre.

    CIVICUS conversa con Jessica Dercontée, coorganizadora del Colectivo contra el Racismo Ambiental (CAER), un grupo de la sociedad civil de Dinamarca que trabaja para introducir el tema de la discriminación y la injusticia racial en el debate danés acerca del clima, llamando la atención del público sobre el racismo ambiental.

    El activismo y la labor académica de Jessica se centran en la gobernanza del clima y exploran las arraigadas injusticias sociales y climáticas relacionadas con la clase, el género y la raza. Jessica es coordinadora de proyectos de desarrollo internacional en el Sindicato de Estudiantes Daneses y en el Consejo Danés de la Juventud para los Refugiados, y asistente de investigación en la consultora In Futurum.

    Jessica Dercontee

    ¿Cuáles son los objetivos del CAER? 

    Somos un colectivo formado por mujeres y personas no binarias de color que trabajan en la intersección del ecologismo, el antirracismo y la justicia climática. CAER busca movilizar y amplificar las voces de las personas más afectadas por el racismo ambiental, incluidas las personas negras, indígenas y de color en el sur global, así como en el norte global. Nuestro colectivo se formó para dar visibilidad y tener una mirada crítica en los actuales debates y conceptualizaciones, subrayando los efectos diferenciadores de la crisis climática y medioambiental.

    ¿Cuál es el principal problema climático o medioambiental en el que están trabajando? 

    El CAER se centra en la ecología política y el neocolonialismo de los principales debates daneses sobre el medio ambiente y el clima. Los principales debates públicos sobre la crisis climática que tienen lugar en Dinamarca están centrados en los impactos perjudiciales que nuestra cultura de consumo y estilos de vida tienen sobre los biosistemas del planeta, y en cambio prestan menos atención a las personas afectadas por estos impactos y al deseo inagotable de las grandes empresas de obtener beneficios y maximizar sus utilidades. Aunque estamos de acuerdo respecto de lo urgente de estas cuestiones, nuestro colectivo considera que el debate en Dinamarca debería ir más allá de la afirmación de la necesidad de que los gobiernos y otras partes interesadas encuentren grandes soluciones tecnológicas para mitigar la crisis climática. El debate público actual es demasiado simplista, apolítico y técnico, centrado en la búsqueda de soluciones verdes. 

    El CAER subraya las diferentes dinámicas de poder que caracterizan a nuestros actuales sistemas, así como el modo en que las actuales prácticas y formas de pensar perpetúan el colonialismo y la opresión global, que además están fuertemente arraigados en el capitalismo. Lo hacemos a través de talleres, artículos, sensibilización en las redes sociales y colaboraciones con personas o grupos marginados del sur global. 

    Un ejemplo de cómo aportamos una perspectiva diferente al tema de la transición verde es nuestro análisis de la forma en que las grandes empresas danesas causan degradación medioambiental e impulsan el acaparamiento de tierras en el sur global. La empresa danesa de energía eólica Vestas tiene actualmente una causa judicial en contra, iniciada por comunidades indígenas de México que acusan a la corporación de causar impactos negativos en los medios de vida de los pueblos indígenas, además de vincularla con severas violaciones de los derechos humanos de manifestantes locales y activistas de la sociedad civil que han sido objeto de intimidación y amenazas de muerte por denunciar estos abusos. Los gobiernos de ambos países han llegado a acuerdos que, según ellos, eran mutuamente beneficiosos, ya que se esperaba que aportaran crecimiento económico y desarrollo a México, además de ayudar a Dinamarca a ecologizar su economía. Sin embargo, el subsiguiente acaparamiento de tierras ha privado de derechos a comunidades del sur global, perpetuando el ciclo de dependencia de la ayuda y regurgitando formas neocoloniales de control y explotación de las tierras y los pueblos indígenas.

    Otro ejemplo mucho más cercano a Dinamarca es el del racismo medioambiental que impregna las relaciones de Dinamarca con Groenlandia, excolonia y actual nación de la Commonwealth danesa. Debido al control que ejerce Dinamarca sobre los recursos naturales de Groenlandia, la población de este país está excluida de las decisiones importantes sobre el futuro del Ártico, lo cual cabe considerar que tiene un gran impacto racial en el área de la conservación, la política medioambiental y el consumismo.

    El principal objetivo del CAER ha sido proporcionar un espacio seguro para las personas negras, indígenas y de color, incluidas las que son queer y trans, que quieran movilizarse en los espacios del ecologismo y el antirracismo en Dinamarca. A menudo se considera que el movimiento danés por el clima ha sido excluyente y discriminatorio hacia estas personas. Esperamos que el discurso público danés no se limite a utilizar y presentar a las comunidades marginadas como casos de estudio, sino que las sitúe en el centro de la acción por el clima como legítimas proveedoras de soluciones y participantes activas en la toma de decisiones.

    ¿Han enfrentado a reacciones negativas por el trabajo que hacen?

    Nos hemos encontrado con un auténtico entusiasmo por parte de otras organizaciones y actores que están dispuestos a cambiar sus estructuras organizativas y hacerlas más inclusivas y aptas para encontrar soluciones a la crisis en que nos encontramos. Aunque no hemos experimentado ninguna reacción negativa directa como consecuencia de nuestro trabajo o de nuestro foco en la raza y el carácter discriminatorio de la política medioambiental, nos parece que la sociedad no está preparada para lidiar con las diversas realidades que experimenta la gente sobre el terreno, que son diferentes de la narrativa extremadamente homogeneizada de la experiencia danesa. En Dinamarca, las leyes y las políticas han sido consideradas inclusivas sobre la base de la imagen progresista de nuestro modelo de estado de bienestar que protege a todas las personas. Así, tanto a las instituciones como a las personas les resulta más difícil comprender que su propia posición de privilegio descansa en la explotación y la opresión de otros grupos sociales, no solamente en el pasado histórico sino también en la actualidad.

    ¿Cómo se vinculan con el movimiento internacional por el clima?

    Nos vinculamos con el movimiento internacional por el clima a partir de nuestro objetivo de descolonizar las estructuras del activismo climático. Además, buscamos activamente entablar colaboraciones, y esto se refleja en los ejemplos que seleccionamos como la cara visible de nuestros proyectos y en las voces que intentamos amplificar. Tratamos de devolver poder y crear espacios donde las personas marginadas puedan contar sus propias historias y aportar sus conocimientos y soluciones a la crisis climática. Además, al construir y compartir conocimiento desde tantas perspectivas y con aportes de tantos académicos del sur global como sea posible, tratamos de ofrecer un contrapeso al etnocentrismo que impregna al intercambio de conocimiento en materia de gobernanza del clima, acción climática y ecologismo.

    ¿Qué esperanzas tienen de que la COP26 logre avances en cuestiones climáticas?

    En el CAER esperamos que, aunque el escenario actual de la COP26 tiene la importante limitación de carecer de representación diversa, haya espacio para la expresión del conocimiento vital del sur global y para el involucramiento de un conjunto diverso de voces en la elaboración de políticas, de modo tal que la próxima ronda de objetivos tenga mayores matices y sea lo más interseccional posible.

    ¿Qué cambio les gustaría que ocurriera para ayudar a resolver la crisis climática?

    Esperamos que en un futuro próximo nuestro movimiento contra el racismo medioambiental crezca, y que esto nos permita tender puentes entre la corriente principal del movimiento climático y el movimiento antirracista danés, de modo de mitigar la crisis climática de una manera mucho más inclusiva y abierta a la diversidad y a la pluralidad de conocimientos, abarcando a diferentes sectores e instituciones de Dinamarca, así como del resto del mundo.

    El espacio cívico en Dinamarca es calificado como “abierto” por elCIVICUS Monitor.
    Póngase en contacto con el Colectivo contra el Racismo Ambiental a través de su cuenta deInstagram o enviando un correo electrónico a. 

     

  • COP26: “Los tomadores de decisiones tienen objetivos nacionales pero los problemas son transnacionales”

    Al tiempo que la 26ª Conferencia de las Partes de las Naciones Unidas sobre el Cambio Climático (COP26) tiene lugar en Glasgow, Reino Unido, entre el 31 de octubre y el 12 de noviembre de 2021, CIVICUS continúa entrevistando a activistas, líderes y expertos de la sociedad civil sobre los desafíos medioambientales que enfrentan en sus contextos, las acciones que están llevando a cabo para abordarlos y sus expectativas respecto de la cumbre.

     

  • COP26: “Mi esperanza reside en que la gente se una para exigir justicia”

    Mitzi Jonelle TanEn vísperas de la 26ª Conferencia de las Partes de las Naciones Unidas sobre el Cambio Climático (COP26), que tendrá lugar en Glasgow, Reino Unido, entre el 31 de octubre y el 12 de noviembre de 2021, CIVICUS está entrevistando a activistas, líderes y personas expertas de la sociedad civil acerca de los desafíos medioambientales que enfrentan en sus contextos, las acciones que están llevando a cabo para abordarlos y sus expectativas para la próxima cumbre.

    CIVICUS conversa con Mitzi Jonelle Tan, una joven activista por la justicia climática basada en el área metropolitana de Manila, Filipinas, integrante de Jóvenes Defensores del Clima de Filipinas y participante activa del movimiento internacional Viernes por el Futuro.

    ¿Cuál es el principal problema climático en tu comunidad?

    Filipinas padece numerosos impactos del cambio climático, desde sequías cada vez más largas y con mayor calor hasta tifones cada vez más frecuentes e intensos. Aparte de estos impactos climáticos -a los cuales no hemos podido adaptarnos y que nos dejan sin apoyos a la hora de afrontar las pérdidas y los daños-, también enfrentamos numerosos proyectos que son destructivos para el medio ambiente, a menudo emprendidos por empresas multinacionales extranjeras, que nuestro gobierno está permitiendo e incluso fomentando.

    Jóvenes Defensores del Clima de Filipinas, la versión filipina de Viernes por el Futuro, aboga por la justicia climática y por que las voces de las personas de las comunidades más afectadas tengan espacio y sean escuchadas y amplificadas. Yo me convertí en activista en 2017, después de haber trabajado con líderes indígenas de Filipinas, porque este trabajo me hizo comprender que la única manera de lograr una sociedad más justa y más verde es a través de la acción colectiva conducente al cambio sistémico.

    ¿Han enfrentado reacciones negativas por el trabajo que hacen?

    Sí, al igual que cualquiera que se manifieste en contra de la injusticia y la inacción, nuestro gobierno, a través de sus troles a sueldo, designa como terroristas a los activistas: básicamente nos llama terroristas por exigir rendición de cuentas y presionar por un cambio. El hecho de ser activista por el clima va siempre acompañado de temor en Filipinas, el país que por ocho años consecutivos ha sido calificado como el más peligroso de Asia para las personas defensoras y activistas ambientales. Ya no se trata solamente de temor por los impactos climáticos, sino también de temor a que la policía y las fuerzas del Estado vengan a por nosotros y nos hagan desaparecer.

    ¿Cómo te vinculas con el movimiento internacional por el clima?

    Hago mucho trabajo de organización con la comunidad internacional, especialmente a través de Viernes por el Futuro - Personas y Áreas Más Afectadas, uno de los grupos del sur global de Viernes por el Futuro. Lo hacemos manteniendo conversaciones, aprendiendo unos de otros y creando estrategias juntos, todo ello mientras nos divertimos. Es importante que el movimiento global de jóvenes esté muy bien interconectado, que se una y exhiba solidaridad para poder abordar realmente el problema global de la crisis climática.

    ¿Qué esperanzas tienes de que la COP26 resulte en avances, y qué utilidad le encuentras a este tipo de procesos internacionales?

    Mi esperanza no reside en los mal llamados líderes, políticos que se han adaptado al sistema y lo han gestionado durante décadas para beneficio de unos pocos, normalmente del norte global. Mi esperanza reside en la gente: en los activistas y organizaciones de la sociedad civil que se juntan para exigir justicia y poner en evidencia que este sistema enfocado en las ganancias que nos condujo a esta crisis no es el que necesitamos para salir de ella. Creo que la COP26 es un momento crucial y este proceso internacional tiene que resultar útil, porque ya hemos tenido 24 que no han aportado gran cosa. Estos problemas deberían haberse resuelto en la primera COP, y de un modo u otro tenemos que asegurarnos de que esta COP sea útil y resulte en cambios significativos, y no en más promesas vacías.

    ¿Qué cambios desearías que ocurrieran para comenzar a resolver la crisis climática?

    El único cambio que pido es uno grande: un cambio de sistema. Tenemos que cambiar este sistema que prioriza la sobreexplotación del sur global y de los pueblos marginados en beneficio del norte global y de unos pocos privilegiados. El desarrollo bien entendido no debería basarse en el PBI y el crecimiento eterno, sino en la calidad de vida de las personas. Esto es factible, pero solamente si abordamos la crisis climática y todas las demás injusticias socioeconómicas que están en su raíz.

    El espacio cívico enFilipinas es calificado como “represivopor elCIVICUS Monitor.
    Póngase en contacto con Jóvenes Defensores del Clima de Filipinas a través de susitio web o su página deFacebook, y siga a Mitzi Jonelle enTwitter eInstagram.

     

     

  • COP26: “Se esgrimen falsas soluciones para desviar nuestra atención de los responsables”

    Lia Mai TorresEn vísperas de la 26ª Conferencia de las Partes de las Naciones Unidas sobre el Cambio Climático (COP26), que tendrá lugar en Glasgow, Reino Unido, entre el 31 de octubre y el 12 de noviembre de 2021, CIVICUS está entrevistando a activistas, líderes y personas expertas de la sociedad civil acerca de los desafíos medioambientales que enfrentan en sus contextos, las acciones que están llevando a cabo para abordarlos y sus expectativas para la próxima cumbre.

    CIVICUS conversa con Lia Mai Torres, directora ejecutiva del Center for Environmental Concerns (CEC) - Filipinas, una organización de la sociedad civil (OSC) que ayuda a las comunidades filipinas a afrontar desafíos medioambientales. Fundada en 1989 por iniciativa de organizaciones que representan a pescadores, agricultores, pueblos indígenas, mujeres, personas que experimentan pobreza urbana y sectores profesionales, el CEC se dedica a la investigación, la educación, la incidencia y las campañas medioambientales. También integra la secretaría de la Red de Defensores del Medio Ambiente de Asia y el Pacífico (APNED), una coalición de organizaciones que trabajan solidariamente para proteger el medio ambiente y a sus defensores.

    ¿Cuál es el principal problema climático en tu país?

    El principal problema ambiental que enfrenta Filipinas actualmente es la proliferación de proyectos y programas destructivos del medio ambiente. Esta situación ha persistido e incluso empeorado durante la pandemia.

    Recientemente, el gobierno actual levantó una moratoria a la minería, basándose en el argumento de que ayudaría a la recuperación de la economía, después de que ésta se viera duramente afectada por la mala respuesta a la pandemia. Esto habilitará unos 100 acuerdos mineros en diferentes partes del país. Muchas comunidades se opusieron a esta medida debido a los impactos negativos que ya tienen los proyectos mineros actualmente en funcionamiento. Un ejemplo de ello es el pueblo de Didipio, Nueva Vizcaya, en el norte de Filipinas, donde se renovó por 25 años más un acuerdo minero con la empresa australiano-canadiense OceanaGold. Las comunidades indígenas de Bugkalot y Tuwali ya sufren la falta de suministro de agua debido a la actividad minera y temen que esto empeore si dicha actividad continúa.

    Los proyectos de infraestructura también son una prioridad del gobierno, que afirma que estos contribuirán a mejorar la situación de la economía. Sin embargo, hay proyectos financiados con onerosos préstamos extranjeros que solo empeorarán la situación de la población local. Un ejemplo de ello es la represa de Kaliwa, financiada por China, en la provincia de Rizal, al sur de la isla de Luzón. La reserva invadirá los territorios ancestrales del pueblo indígena Dumagat, incluidos sus lugares sagrados, así como un área protegida.

    Otro ejemplo son las plantaciones de monocultivo que se encuentran sobre todo en las provincias de Mindanao. Las tierras ancestrales de los pueblos indígenas Lumad se han convertido en plantaciones de plátanos y piñas. Algunos residentes reportan enfermedades causadas por los productos químicos sintéticos utilizados en las plantaciones y muchos están siendo desplazados de sus tierras de cultivo.

    Estos son algunos ejemplos de proyectos prioritarios impulsados por el gobierno para conducirnos al llamado desarrollo. Sin embargo, es evidente que no mejoran realmente la situación de las comunidades locales, que en su mayoría ya se encuentran en situación de pobreza. Además, los recursos naturales del país en su mayoría no son explotados en beneficio de sus ciudadanos, ya que los productos extraídos se destinan a la exportación. Se benefician de ellos unas pocas empresas locales e internacionales. Los recursos naturales se utilizan para obtener beneficios y no para impulsar el desarrollo nacional.

    ¿Han enfrentado a reacciones negativas por el trabajo que realizan?

    El CEC trabaja con las comunidades locales, ya que creemos que las luchas medioambientales no pueden ganarse sin el esfuerzo conjunto de quienes sufren el impacto medioambiental. El verdadero poder proviene de las organizaciones de base. Las OSC como la nuestra y otros sectores deben apoyar sus esfuerzos, conectando las luchas locales para construir un fuerte movimiento medioambiental a nivel nacional e internacional.

    A causa del apoyo que brindamos a las comunidades locales, hemos enfrentado represalias. En 2007, Lafayette Mining Ltd, una empresa minera australiana, presentó una demanda por difamación contra el entonces director ejecutivo de CEC, ya que éste había denunciado los impactos de las actividades de la empresa. En 2019 y 2021, nuestra organización fue víctima de una práctica habitual mediante la cual el gobierno declara a personas y organizaciones como terroristas o comunistas. Lo hizo en represalia por las misiones humanitarias que realizamos tras un tifón y durante la pandemia. 

    También se nos amenazó con una redada policial en nuestra oficina, en represalia por ofrecer refugio a niños indígenas Lumad que se habían visto obligados a abandonar sus comunidades debido a la militarización, las amenazas y el acoso. Nuestras acciones de protesta pacífica suelen ser dispersadas violentamente por la policía y las fuerzas de seguridad privadas, y en 2019 un miembro del personal de nuestra organización fue detenido.

    Detrás de todos estos ataques están las fuerzas de seguridad del Estado junto con las fuerzas de seguridad privadas de las corporaciones. La policía y el ejército claramente se han convertido en parte de las fuerzas de seguridad de las corporaciones, utilizando medidas represivas para garantizar el buen funcionamiento de sus operaciones.

    ¿Cómo se vinculan con el movimiento internacional por el clima?

    Dado que muchos países, especialmente del sur global, están experimentando problemas medioambientales similares, reconocemos la necesidad de conectarnos con organizaciones de otros países. En 2015, el CEC se contó entre los convocantes de la Conferencia Internacional de los Pueblos sobre la Minería, que ofreció a personas defensoras del medio ambiente la posibilidad de aprender de las experiencias de los demás y coordinar campañas locales.

    El CEC también ayudó a crear la APNED, una red de campañas solidarias que provee apoyo mutuo para la realización de campañas, plantea los temas a nivel internacional, aboga por una mayor protección de las personas defensoras, realiza actividades de capacitación y facilita servicios. Creemos que la solidaridad entre personas defensoras es importante para ayudar a fortalecer los movimientos locales, así como la lucha internacional por nuestros derechos medioambientales.

    ¿Qué esperanzas tienes de que la COP26 resulte en avances, y qué utilidad le encuentras a este tipo de procesos internacionales?

    Incluso antes de la pandemia, existía preocupación por la inclusión de las personas defensoras del medio ambiente de base o en las primeras líneas en procesos internacionales tales como estas conversaciones sobre el clima. La falta de inclusión se hizo más evidente con la pandemia, ya que muchas OSC han tenido dificultades para asistir a causa de los requisitos y gastos adicionales. Además, sólo las organizaciones acreditadas pueden asistir a los actos oficiales, y son muy pocas las que están acreditadas. Asimismo, los informes de los gobiernos suelen estar muy alejados de la realidad. El empeoramiento de la crisis climática es la prueba de que los gobiernos no están haciendo lo suficiente.

    A pesar de ello, seguiremos participando en los eventos formales y paralelos de la COP26, con el objetivo de llamar la atención sobre la forma en que muchos países desarrollados y grandes empresas están profundizando la crisis climática mediante el acaparamiento de recursos y la explotación de los recursos naturales de los países pobres, exacerbando la pobreza existente, y de qué manera se esgrimen falsas soluciones para desviar nuestra atención de su responsabilidad y falta de rendición de cuentas. También queremos destacar la importancia de las personas defensoras del medio ambiente en la protección de nuestro entorno y la defensa de nuestros derechos medioambientales, y por lo tanto la necesidad de garantizar que no sufran más violaciones de sus derechos humanos por motivos políticos que les impidan realizar su importante labor.

    ¿Qué cambios desearías que ocurrieran para comenzar a resolver la crisis climática?

    Esperamos que el marco capitalista orientado al beneficio cambie en Filipinas. Esto garantizaría el abordaje de los conflictos por los recursos, el mantenimiento de la protección del medio ambiente para el equilibrio ecológico, el establecimiento de auténticos programas de adaptación al cambio climático y la atención que los grupos vulnerables necesitan. Esto también supone responsabilizar a los países y a las empresas que contribuyen a la crisis climática y proporcionar apoyo a los países pobres para que puedan adaptarse.

    Elespacio cívico en Filipinas es calificado como “represivopor elCIVICUS Monitor.
    Póngase en contacto con el Center for Environmental Concerns-Filipinas a través de susitio web o su página deFacebook, y siga a@CEC_Phils en Twitter.

     

     

  • COP26: “Se está invirtiendo mucho más dinero en destruir el planeta que en salvarlo”

    La 26ª Conferencia de las Partes de las Naciones Unidas sobre el Cambio Climático (COP26) acaba de terminar en Glasgow, Reino Unido, y CIVICUS continúa entrevistando a activistas, líderes y personas expertas de la sociedad civil sobre los resultados de la cumbre, su potencial para resolver los desafíos medioambientales que enfrentan, y las acciones que están llevando a cabo para abordarlos.

    CIVICUS conversa con Ruth Alipaz Cuqui, lideresa indígena de la Amazonía boliviana y coordinadora general de la Coordinadora Nacional de Defensa de Territorios Indígena Originario Campesino y Áreas Protegidas (CONTIOCAP). La organización surgió a fines de 2018 a partir de la convergencia de varios movimientos de resistencia frente a la destrucción de los territorios indígenas y áreas protegidas por parte de proyectos extractivos y la cooptación de las organizaciones tradicionales de representación de los pueblos indígenas. Inicialmente integrada por 12 movimientos, actualmente incluye a 35 procedentes de toda Bolivia.

    RuthAlipaz

    ¿En qué problemas ambientales se enfoca su trabajo?

    Como defensora de territorios indígenas, derechos indígenas y derechos de la naturaleza, realizo mi labor en tres diferentes ámbitos. En primer lugar, a nivel personal, en mi comunidad del Pueblo Indígena Uchupiamona, que está en su totalidad dentro de una de las áreas protegidas con mayor diversidad en el mundo, el Parque Nacional Madidi.

    En 2009 mi pueblo estuvo a punto de dar una concesión forestal que devastaría 31.000 hectáreas de bosque, en un área sensible para la preservación de agua y particularmente rico en diversidad de aves. Para evitar esa concesión hice una propuesta alternativa, de turismo especializado en observación de aves. Si bien actualmente, a causa de la pandemia, la opción del turismo ha demostrado no ser la más segura, lo cierto es que gracias a esa actividad siguen estando los bosques, aunque siempre bajo amenaza debido a la presión de la gente de la comunidad que requiere dinero inmediato.

    Actualmente, mi comunidad enfrenta serios problemas de abastecimiento de agua, pero nos hemos organizado con mujeres jóvenes para restaurar nuestras fuentes de agua mediante la reforestación con plantas nativas frutales y la transmisión de conocimientos de la gente mayor hacia las mujeres y niños sobre estas plantas frutales y medicinales.

    En segundo lugar, soy miembro de la Mancomunidad de Comunidades Indígenas de los Ríos Beni, Tuichi y Quiquibey, una organización de base de la región amazónica de Bolivia, que desde 2016 lidera la defensa de territorios de seis Naciones Indígenas -Ese Ejja, Leco, Moseten, Tacana, Tsiman yd Uchupiamona- de la amenaza de construcción de dos centrales hidroeléctricas, Chepete y El Bala, que inundarían nuestros territorios, desplazando a más de cinco mil indígenas, obstruirían para siempre tres ríos, y devastarían dos áreas protegidas: el Parque Nacional Madidi y la Reserva de Biósfera Pilón Lajas. El 16 de agosto de 2021, las organizaciones indígenas afines al gobierno autorizaron la puesta en marcha de estas centrales hidroeléctricas.

    Por otro lado, el Rio Tuichi, que está dentro del área protegida Madidi y es esencial para mi Pueblo Uchupiamona para nuestra actividad de ecoturismo comunitario, ha sido en su totalidad concesionado en forma inconsulta a terceros ajenos a la comunidad, para el desarrollo de actividad minera aluvial aurífera. La Ley de Minería y Metalurgia discrimina a los pueblos indígenas permitiendo que cualquier actor externo pueda adquirir derechos sobre nuestros territorios.

    Finalmente, soy coordinadora general de CONTIOCAP, una organización que ha denunciado las violaciones sistemáticas de nuestros derechos en los territorios indígenas de las cuatro macro regiones de Bolivia: el Chaco, Valles, Altiplano y Amazonia. Estas violaciones vienen de la mano de la exploración y la explotación petrolera, el incendio de bosques y la deforestación para liberar tierras para los agronegocios, la construcción de carreteras y centrales hidroeléctricas, y la actividad de minería aluvial aurífera que está envenenando a poblaciones vulnerables.

    ¿Han enfrentado reacciones negativas por el trabajo que realizan?

    Hemos enfrentado reacciones negativas, procedentes principalmente desde el Estado, a través de instancias descentralizadas como las agencias de Impuestos Nacionales y Migración. Recientemente he descubierto que mis cuentas bancarias tienen orden de retenciones por demandas de esos organismos.

    Durante la marcha liderada por la Nación Qhara en 2019, he sufrido seguimiento y acoso físico constante de dos personas, mientras estaba en la ciudad presentando nuestros proyectos de ley junto a líderes de la marcha.

    Y recientemente, cuando las organizaciones indígenas afines al gobierno dieron autorización para las centrales hidroeléctricas, nuestras denuncias fueron respondidas con acciones para descalificarnos y desacreditarnos, algo que el gobierno boliviano viene haciendo desde hace años. Dicen, por ejemplo, que quienes nos oponemos a los megaproyectos hidroeléctricos no somos representantes legítimos de los pueblos indígenas sino activistas financiados por ONG internacionales.

    ¿Cómo se conectan sus acciones con el movimiento global por el clima?

    Nuestras acciones convergen con las del movimiento global, porque al defender nuestros territorios y las áreas protegidas contribuimos no solamente a evitar mayor deforestación y contaminación de ríos y fuentes de agua y a preservar los suelos para mantener nuestra soberanía alimentaria, sino también a conservar los conocimientos ancestrales que contribuyen a nuestra resiliencia frente a la crisis climática. 

    Los pueblos indígenas hemos demostrado ser los más eficientes protectores de los ecosistemas y la biodiversidad, así como de recursos fundamentales para la vida tales como el agua, los ríos y los territorios, en contra posición del Estado cuyas leyes más bien sirven para violentar nuestros espacios de vida.

    ¿Han hecho uso de los espacios de participación y foros de denuncia de los organismos internacionales?

    Sí, lo hacemos regularmente, por ejemplo solicitando a la Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos que dé seguimiento a la criminalización y la violencia contra las personas defensoras de derechos de los pueblos indígenas en Bolivia y participando de la realización colectiva de un informe sombra de la sociedad civil para el Examen Periódico Universal de Bolivia en el Consejo de Derechos Humanos de las Naciones Unidas, que presentamos en las pre-sesiones del Consejo en octubre 2019.

    Recientemente, en una audiencia en la ciudad de La Paz, presentamos un informe sobre las violaciones a nuestros derechos al Relator Especial de Pueblos Indígenas de las Naciones Unidas.

    ¿Qué opina de los espacios de participación para la sociedad civil en las COP, y cómo evalúa los resultados de la recién finalizada COP26?

    Una vez más, en la COP26 los Estados han demostrado una total ineficiencia para actuar en cumplimiento de sus propias determinaciones. Yo he manifestado en más de una ocasión que el 2030 estaba a la vuelta de la esquina y hoy ya estamos a escasos ocho años y se sigue discutiendo qué medidas serán las más eficientes para alcanzar las metas fijadas para esa fecha.

    Se está invirtiendo mucho más dinero en destruir el planeta que en salvarlo. Eso es el resultado de acciones y decisiones de los Estados en pro del capitalismo salvaje que está destruyendo el planeta con su extractivismo depredador de la vida.

    Veamos cuanto se avanzó desde el Protocolo de Kioto, acordado en 2005 para reducir las emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero. Todo quedó en palabras, y encima en los últimos años las empresas se han amparado en el supuesto concepto de “derecho al desarrollo” para seguir operando en perjuicio del planeta, y sobre todo de las poblaciones más vulnerables como los pueblos indígenas. Somos nosotros quienes pagamos los costos, y no quien ocasiona los desastres.

    Los resultados de la COP26 no me satisfacen porque queremos ver acciones concretas. El Estado Boliviano ni siquiera ha firmado la declaración, pese a que ha utilizado el espacio de la COP26 para dar un discurso engañoso de que se debe cambiar el modelo capitalista por uno más amable con la naturaleza. Pero en Bolivia ya hemos deforestado alrededor de 10 millones de has de bosque, de la forma más brutal imaginable, a través de incendios que por más de una década y media han sido legalizados por el gobierno.

    Pienso que mientras en estos espacios no se discutan sanciones para los Estados que no cumplan acuerdos, o que no firman siquiera las declaraciones, no habrá resultados concretos.

    El espacio cívico en Bolivia es calificado como “obstruido” por elCIVICUS Monitor.
    Póngase en contacto con CONTIOCAP a través de su página deFacebook y siga a@contiocap y a@CuquiRuth en Twitter.

     

     

  • COP26: “Sigue faltando conciencia de que necesitamos proteger el clima para protegernos a nosotros mismos”

    En vísperas de la 26ª Conferencia de las Partes de las Naciones Unidas sobre el Cambio Climático (COP26), que tendrá lugar en Glasgow, Reino Unido, entre el 31 de octubre y el 12 de noviembre de 2021, CIVICUS está entrevistando a activistas, líderes y personas expertas de la sociedad civil acerca de los desafíos medioambientales que enfrentan en sus contextos, las acciones que están llevando a cabo para abordarlos y sus expectativas para la próxima cumbre.

    CIVICUS conversa con Sascha Müller-Kraenner, director ejecutivo de Acción Medioambiental Alemania(Deutsche Umwelthilfe), una organización que promueve modos de vida sostenibles y sistemas económicos que respetan los límites ecológicos. Lleva más de 40 años defendiendo la conservación de la diversidad biológica y la protección del clima y los bienes naturales.

    Sascha Muller Kraenner

    Foto: Stefan Wieland

    ¿Cuál es el principal problema climático en su país?

    Alemania y Europa deben eliminar progresivamente el gas fósil para tener alguna esperanza de mantener el calentamiento global por debajo de 1,5ºC. Los políticos aún no aceptan esta realidad, y el debate público se ve enturbiado por el lobby del gas, que impulsa una campaña engañosa para presentar el gas fósil como limpio, barato y respetuoso del medio ambiente. Pero tomarse en serio la preservación del clima supone transformar todo el sistema energético, y en esta transformación el gas fósil no tiene cabida. Tenemos que dejar de subvencionarlo y de construir nuevas obras de infraestructura a su servicio.

    Las energías renovables y la eficiencia energética deben ampliarse masivamente para reducir la demanda de gas y generar energía limpia. En el sector de la calefacción, tenemos que prohibir la venta de nuevos calentadores de gas y sustituir los existentes por tecnologías sostenibles, tales como las bombas de calor, en lugar de ofrecer falsas soluciones como el hidrógeno.

    La aparición de los llamados “gases verdes”, como el hidrógeno, supone una amenaza y una oportunidad en este sentido, y el diseño de una normativa adecuada para un futuro neutro desde el punto de vista climático es un desafío fundamental. Como el suministro de hidrógeno verde será muy limitado, ya que su producción es muy costosa, tenemos que utilizarlo solamente en los sectores que son más difíciles de descarbonizar, como los procesos industriales de alta temperatura, más que para la calefacción o el transporte, donde hay otras opciones disponibles.

    ¿De las devastadoras inundaciones que sufrió Alemania en julio, han resultado un mayor reconocimiento de la crisis climática y una mayor voluntad de actuar?

    Un mayor reconocimiento, sí. Las inundaciones fueron atribuidas por la mayoría, y con razón, al cambio climático. Sin embargo, el debate no ha cambiado mucho una vez superada la crisis inmediata. El gobierno tuvo que comprometer 30.000 millones de euros (unos 35.000 millones de dólares) para reparar los daños causados por las inundaciones y reconstruir las regiones afectadas. Sin embargo, en el contexto de las elecciones federales, la política climática fue debatida como un “costo” que la sociedad tiene que pagar por razones altruistas.

    Presentar la política climática como contrapuesta al desarrollo económico es una falsa dicotomía. La verdad es que debemos reducir las emisiones, incluso en las áreas donde resulta difícil, precisamente para evitar que eventos terriblemente costosos como las inundaciones y las sequías sean cada vez más frecuentes. Sigue faltando esta conciencia de que necesitamos proteger el clima para protegernos a nosotros mismos.

    ¿Hasta qué punto la crisis climática estuvo presente en la campaña electoral de octubre, y cómo está presionando el movimiento climático al posible nuevo gobierno para que haga más en ese sentido?

    Según las encuestas, el cambio climático fue el tema más importante de las elecciones. Esto se debe, en parte, a la frustración con el gobierno saliente de “gran coalición”, que se mostró complaciente con la crisis climática, incapaz de alcanzar sus propios objetivos y poco dispuesto a tomar decisiones de gran alcance en áreas críticas como las energías renovables, la construcción, el transporte y la agricultura.

    El movimiento por el clima, y en particular el de Viernes por el Futuro, se ha fortalecido mucho desde las elecciones de 2017. La juventud está movilizada y mantendrá la presión porque teme, y con razón, por su futuro. Es muy probable que el partido de los Verdes forme parte del nuevo gobierno tras conseguir el mejor resultado electoral de su historia. Esto es un buen augurio para la política climática así como para el ejercicio de influencia por parte del movimiento por el clima. El Partido Verde es, de lejos, el más experto y dispuesto a adoptar una política climática ambiciosa, y también el más abierto a las preocupaciones del movimiento por el clima.

    ¿Cómo se vinculan con el movimiento internacional por el clima?

    Deutsche Umwelthilfe se vincula con el movimiento por el clima en Europa a través de su membresía en asociaciones paraguas como Climate Action Network-Europe y European Environmental Bureau. Participamos regularmente junto con nuestros socios europeos en intercambios y grupos de trabajo sobre diversos temas, tales como la eliminación progresiva del gas, la regulación de las emisiones de metano, el financiamiento sostenible y la calefacción sustentable.

    ¿Qué esperanzas tiene de que la COP26 resulte en avances, y qué utilidad le encuentra a este tipo de procesos internacionales?

    No hay duda de que la cooperación internacional es crucial si queremos limitar el calentamiento global de forma efectiva, y el Acuerdo de París es testimonio de ello. Sin embargo, desde el inicio de la serie de reuniones de la Conferencia de las Partes hemos visto un aumento continuo de las emisiones a nivel global. Muchos también critican estos eventos porque están fuertemente patrocinados por la industria y, por lo tanto, sus resultados están algo inclinados en dirección de las expectativas de la industria.

    Así, los procesos internacionales son, por un lado, cruciales, pero, por otro, son también una oportunidad para que la industria de los combustibles fósiles gane, o al menos conserve, su reputación como parte de la solución a la crisis climática, al tiempo que en muchos casos continúa impidiendo que se produzcan avances.

    Por lo tanto, debemos tener cuidado al considerar de manera realista los resultados que pueden surgir de la COP26. Espero que se avance en compromisos de reducción de emisiones para estar en condiciones de cumplir el Acuerdo de París. Pero será necesario que la sociedad civil exija e implemente los cambios necesarios, independientemente del resultado de la COP26. Nosotros somos y seguiremos siendo parte de ese cambio.

    ¿Qué cambio le gustaría que ocurriera para ayudar a resolver la crisis climática?

    En los últimos años hemos sido testigos de los increíbles esfuerzos realizados por la generación joven para que por fin se actúe en consonancia con las promesas hechas en el Acuerdo de París. Sin embargo, con demasiada frecuencia los responsables de la toma de decisiones hacen caso omiso de sus conocimientos y demandas en torno a la crisis climática y, en cambio, siguen actuando como de costumbre. Creo que todos nos beneficiaríamos si la juventud tuviera mayor influencia en los procesos de toma de decisiones con potencial para detener el calentamiento global.

    El espacio cívico en Alemania es calificado como “abierto por elCIVICUS Monitor.
    Póngase en contacto con Deutsche Umwelthilfe a través de susitio web o sus páginas deFacebook eInstagram, y siga a@Umwelthilfe y a@sascha_m_k en Twitter. 

     

  • COP26: “Una prioridad clave es abordar la vulnerabilidad a nivel comunitario”

    Mubiru HuzaifahEn vísperas de la 26ª Conferencia de las Partes de las Naciones Unidas sobre el Cambio Climático (COP26), que tendrá lugar en Glasgow, Reino Unido, entre el 31 de octubre y el 12 de noviembre de 2021, CIVICUS está entrevistando a activistas, líderes y personas expertas de la sociedad civil acerca de los desafíos medioambientales que enfrentan en sus contextos, las acciones que están llevando a cabo para abordarlos y sus expectativas para la próxima cumbre.

    CIVICUS conversa con Mubiru Huzaifah, de la Organización Cristiana Ecológica (ECO) de Uganda, una organización de la sociedad civil (OSC) que trabaja para asegurar medios de vida sostenibles a los grupos marginados, desatendidos y vulnerables de Uganda. Sus iniciativas en curso se centran en la gobernanza de los recursos naturales, la resiliencia y la adaptación al cambio climático y la gestión y restauración de los ecosistemas.

    ¿Cuál es el problema climático en el cual actualmente se centra su trabajo?

    El tema que más nos preocupa son los altos niveles de vulnerabilidad que el cambio climático está generando en los sistemas humanos. El cambio de largo plazo de los elementos climáticos con respecto a los niveles previamente aceptados está provocando cambios en los sistemas medioambientales y humanos. Según los informes sobre el estado del medio ambiente publicados por la Autoridad Nacional de Gestión Medioambiental de Uganda, los principales problemas relacionados con el cambio climático son la contaminación industrial, la quema indiscriminada de vegetación, el uso ineficaz de los combustibles y la mala planificación de las redes de transporte, todo lo cual genera altos niveles de emisiones.

    ¿Existen iniciativas gubernamentales para mitigar el cambio climático?

    Hay un proyecto de mitigación que está implementando el Ministerio de Agua y Medio Ambiente, denominado Mejoramiento de los Ingresos Agrícolas y Conservación de los Bosques, que reparte gratuitamente plántulas que son plantadas para mejorar la capacidad de absorción del suelo. También está el Plan de Subvenciones a la Producción de Aserrín, cuyo objetivo es aumentar los ingresos de la población rural mediante la plantación de árboles comerciales por parte de las comunidades locales y de medianas y grandes empresas, lo que al mismo tiempo contribuye a mitigar los efectos del cambio climático mediante la reforestación intensiva. También hay varios proyectos de energía solar en los distritos de Mayuge, Soroti y Tororo, que han aumentado la producción de energía solar del país, y un proyecto de humedales apoyado por el Fondo Verde para el Clima, que busca conservar los humedales y detener su degradación.

    Otras intervenciones relevantes son la puesta en marcha de sistemas de flujo de agua por gravedad para facilitar el suministro de agua sin utilizar fuentes de energía; el desarrollo de carreteras con canales de drenaje de agua y luces solares y el desarrollo de redes de carreteras libres de atascos que permitan un tráfico fluido y ayuden a reducir las emisiones de los automóviles; y la adopción de motocicletas eléctricas o libres de emisiones para reducir aún más las emisiones resultantes del uso de combustibles fósiles, tema en que el Ministerio de Energía está trabajando junto con el sector privado.

    ¿Qué tipo de trabajo realiza ECO en estos temas?

    El trabajo de ECO apunta a aumentar la resiliencia de las comunidades frente a los impactos del cambio climático, a reducir los riesgos de desastres, a mejorar la gobernanza y la gestión de los recursos naturales, especialmente en el sector extractivo, y a promover la gestión y restauración de los ecosistemas.

    Por ejemplo, en el marco de un proyecto que busca promover y apoyar a las zonas conservadas por las comunidades en la cuenca del lago Victoria, hemos prestado apoyo a prácticas de pesca legal, desarrollado e impartido formación sobre la promoción de la agricultura sostenible y apoyado buenas prácticas de gobernanza de los recursos locales. Tenemos otro proyecto que busca aumentar la transparencia, la inclusión social, la rendición de cuentas y la capacidad de respuesta de las empresas mineras en la región de Karamoja.

    En estos y en muchos otros proyectos en que trabajamos, siempre buscamos impulsar el cambio poniendo en el centro a las personas en riesgo y aprovechando los recursos y conocimientos locales y tradicionales. Intentamos vincular los ámbitos de la acción humanitaria y la labor de desarrollo centrándonos en los medios de subsistencia. Trabajamos para garantizar una planificación adaptativa, tratando de vincular las realidades locales con los procesos globales e integrar disciplinas y enfoques para abarcar diferentes riesgos. Para ello trabajamos en conjunto con comunidades, OSC, organismos gubernamentales, universidades e institutos de investigación, entidades del sector privado y medios de comunicación.

    ¿Cómo se vinculan con el movimiento internacional por el clima?

    Nos vinculamos con el movimiento climático global a través de la Red de Acción Climática-Uganda, que incluye a más de 200 OSC nacionales. Actualmente nosotros la presidimos. Esto nos permite participar como observadores en las reuniones de la COP.

    También participamos en las reuniones consultivas previas a la COP organizadas por el gobierno ugandés para preparar las negociaciones internacionales sobre el cambio climático. En estas reuniones, ayudamos a evaluar los avances realizados en la lucha contra el cambio climático y en materia de cumplimiento de nuestras contribuciones determinadas a nivel nacional.

    Convertimos nuestras lecciones aprendidas en acciones de incidencia que pueden adaptarse a los foros internacionales sobre el cambio climático. Algunos problemas locales pueden alimentar la agenda nacional, convertirse en acciones de política pública y pasar a influir en las políticas internacionales.

    ¿Qué esperanzas tienen de que la COP26 produzca avances en materia de mitigación del cambio climático?

    Esperamos que de la COP26 surja una nueva plataforma de comercialización para el comercio de emisiones que sustituya al Mecanismo de Desarrollo Limpio, que permitía a los países con un compromiso de reducción o limitación de emisiones en virtud del Protocolo de Kioto poner en marcha proyectos de reducción de emisiones en los países en desarrollo. También esperamos que se comprometan más fondos para acelerar la difusión de energías renovables.

    Estos procesos internacionales son relevantes siempre que contribuyan a la financiación de los esfuerzos de mitigación del cambio climático y produzcan estrategias de financiación novedosas, como el Fondo Verde para el Clima y el Fondo de Adaptación y su programa piloto para fomentar la innovación en las prácticas de adaptación de los países vulnerables. Viniendo de un país en vías de desarrollo, creo que es fundamental aumentar inmediatamente el financiamiento de medidas de adaptación, ya que los impactos perturbadores del cambio climático sobre los sistemas humanos ya son evidentes.

    ¿Qué cambio le gustaría ver -en el mundo o en su comunidad- que ayudaría a resolver la crisis climática?

    Una prioridad clave es abordar la vulnerabilidad a nivel comunitario. Nuestra visión es la de una comunidad con mayor capacidad de adaptación para hacer frente a los impactos del cambio climático y sus efectos ulteriores. Esto puede hacerse aumentando el acceso a tecnologías y proporcionando financiamiento para la mitigación y la adaptación a través de estructuras comunitarias.

    El espacio cívico enUganda es calificado como “represivopor elCIVICUS Monitor.
    Póngase en contacto con la Organización Cristiana Ecológica a través de susitio web o su página deFacebook, y siga a@EcoChristianOrg en Twitter.

     

  • World leaders meet at COP26 but many participants from the frontlines of climate change are left out in the cold

    The stakes are higher than ever at COP26 and the lives of many of the world’s most disadvantaged communities hang in the balance, with rising sea levels, major storms, floods and droughts all increasing due to climate change. Governments must be ambitious and deliver on their commitments to de-carbonise our economies by 2030.

    The negotiations at COP need accountability as there is an inherent power imbalance within the UN talks between industrialized countries and countries of the global South.

    However, the possibility for participation of community representatives from areas that are directly affected around the world has been very restricted and, in some cases, individuals have been harassed or excluded by their own governments. These communities will largely be left out of the physical negotiations which are critical in holding the high polluting member states to account.

    Barriers for participation have been far higher at this COP than in previous years, in part due to travel restrictions linked to the Covid-19 pandemic. The inequality of access has been massively exacerbated by the inequities of vaccine provision. Many of the communities most affected by the climate crisis are also suffering an artificial shortage of vaccines - and the lack of solidarity shown by wealthier donor countries such as the UK and Germany in blocking the sharing of vaccine technology and thereby preventing developing countries from producing their own vaccines.

    Additional challenges have come in the form of a very restrictive visa regime in the UK, which has been particularly restrictive to individuals coming from outside Europe and North America and has often led to lengthy delays for travel bookings which creates a knock-on effect of prohibitively high travel costs. In some cases, there has also been direct targeting of human rights defenders who advocate for climate and social justice.

    From established democracies including the United Kingdom, Australia and Austria as well as other countries like Kazakhstan, Uganda and Egypt, groups protesting for climate justice and the protection of the environment have been violently dispersed. In countries including Honduras, Philippines, Nicaragua and Columbia, human rights defenders advocating for climate justice and for the protection of indigenous rights and the rights of communities are jailed and persecuted. This direct intimidation and detaining of activists prevents the voices of essential communities from being heard in global forums.

    REACTIONS FROM GLOBAL CIVIL SOCIETY

    Tasneem Essop, Executive Director, Climate Action Network says:
    ”We know civil society participation is critical to get a strong outcome from COP26. Yet by pushing for a physical COP in the middle of a global pandemic, with all the restrictions on travel and exorbitant costs, we can see that real and meaningful participation is under threat. This is particularly true for those from vulnerable communities from the global South. The issues on the table at this COP pertaining to finance, loss and damage and keeping 1.5C in sight require those most impacted to have a seat at the table, to scrutinise outcomes from governments, hold polluters accountable and fight to secure a safe and just future.”

    Lysa John, Secretary-General of CIVICUS says:
    “The world is watching while leaders meet at COP26, real action is needed now but many of the people who can bring lived experience of climate change from around the world are being left out. Now more than ever, the perspectives of people who are most affected by the severe impacts of climate change should be heard and respected.”

    Emeline Siale Ilolahia, Director of the Pacific Island Association of NGOs and board member of Action for Sustainable Development says:
    “Many of the Pacific Islands are facing direct threats in terms of loss of land and livelihoods due to climate change but our voices are increasingly drowned out and major economies are not taking responsibility for the wider impacts of their inaction. We have been told that this is the moment to build back better, but we need to see world leaders opening space for a more inclusive vision for the future.”

    STORIES OF KEY ACTIVISTS WHO ARE NOT ABLE TO ATTEND:

    Disha A Ravi (India) is a 23 year old climate justice activist with Fridays For Future India and a writer. She became an activist after she saw her family impacted by the water crisis. She is best known for advocating for better policies and governance for the climate and environmental sector. She is passionate about ensuring that voices from most affected people and areas are represented in climate conversations and negotiations. Her passport has been withheld by authorities.

    Suvendu Biswas (Bangladesh) is a young climate activist working on climate and youth issues in the coastal area of Bangladesh. He supports youth-led digital and climate actions to end climate injustice for his peers and their community people. He was prevented due to high cost of travel and visa

    Nyombi Morris (Uganda) is a 23 year old climate activist from Uganda fighting to include climate change in the curriculum in schools and promoting tree planting. Nyombi has been advocating to Save Bugoma forest and Congo basin since 2019. He was arrested this year during his Fridays for future strikes in Kampala.

    Aïman Atarouwa (Togo) is active in the fight against climate change, in particular: the promotion of renewable energies; supporting the global climate strikes; and leading arts activities on the environment. He could not attend due to COVID-19 travel restrictions.

    Guapinol Water Defenders (Honduras) Porfirio Sorto Cedillo, José Avelino Cedillo, Orbin Naún Hernández, Kevin Alejandro Romero, Arnold Javier Aleman, Ever Alexander Cedillo, Daniel Márquez and Jeremías Martínez Díaz, Defenders of Tocoa, in the northern region of Honduras. They were protesting against the implementation of a mining project in the protected area ”Carlos Escalares” that would endanger fresh water sources in the region. They have been detained and charged with arson and unlawful deprivation of liberty.

    Angela Mendes (Brazil) is the daughter of murdered environmental defender Chico Mendes. She is actively working to protect the rainforest reserves that were set up over the last 20 years in the Western Amazon which are under threat by the Bolsonaro Government. She could not travel due to COVID-19 and visa delays.

    For further information contact:

    Oli Henman, Action for Sustainable Development  or Tel: 07803 169074
    The campaign #UNmuteCOP26 #Facesfromthefrontlines is running at COP26. Check it out here: https://twitter.com/Action4SD/status/1454098027971551233 

     

Página 2 de 2